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2018/05/14 - ADMIN - Agenda Packets - City Council - Study SessionAGENDA MAY 14, 2018 6:30 p.m. STUDY SESSION – Community Room Discussion Items 1. 6:30 p.m. Future Study Session Agenda Planning May 21 and May 29, 2018 2. 6:35 p.m. Common Sound Music Festival Update 3. 6:55 p.m. Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies 4. 7:40 p.m. 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update 9:40 p.m. Communications/Updates (Verbal) 9:45 p.m. Adjourn Written Reports 5. Special Assessment Policy – Sewer and Water Availability Charges 6. Dockless Bicycles Update 7. 2019 Pavement Management CIP Update 8. Westwood Hills Nature Center Project Update Auxiliary aids for individuals with disabilities are available upon request. To make arrangements, please call the Administration Department at 952/924-2525 (TDD 952/924-2518) at least 96 hours in advance of meeting. Meeting: Study Session Meeting Date: May 14, 2018 Discussion Item: 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: Future Study Session Agenda Planning May 21 and May 29, 2018 RECOMMENDED ACTION: The City Council and the City Manager to set the agenda for a special study session on May 21 and for the regularly scheduled study session on May 29, 2018. POLICY CONSIDERATION: Does the Council agree with the agendas as proposed? SUMMARY: This report summarizes the proposed agenda for a special study session on May 21 and the regularly scheduled study session on May 29, 2018. Also attached to this report is the Study Session Prioritizaton & Tentative Discussion Timeline. FINANCIAL OR BUDGET CONSIDERATION: Not applicable. VISION CONSIDERATION: Not applicable. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: Tentative Agenda – May 21 and May 29, 2018 Study Session Prioritization & Projected Discussion Timeline Prepared by: Debbie Fischer, Administrative Services Office Assistant Approved by: Tom Harmening, City Manager Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 1) Page 2 Title: Future Study Session Agenda Planning May 21 and May 29, 2018 MAY 21, 2018 6:30 pm – Special Study Session – Community Room Tentative Discussion Items 1.Regulating Firearms – City Manager (45 minutes) Staff was asked to place this on a study session for discussion. The city attorney will be present to assist with the conversation. MAY 29, 2018 6:00pm (Note early start time.) – Study Session - Community Room Tentative Discussion Items 1. Future Study Session Agenda Planning – Administrative Services (5 minutes) 2.The Nest Update – Community Development (60 minutes) Representatives of The Nest will be requesting financial assistance to open and operate a student center for St. Louis Park High School students. 3.Dockless Bikes – Engineering (30 minutes) Staff desires to provide an update on this matter and receive direction from the council on whether staff should pursue procuring dockless bicycle services in the near future or wait to learn from other cities’ experiences? 4.Davis Group Development Proposal – Community Development (30 minutes) Developer seeks preliminary input on an office redevelopment concept for 6009 Wayzata Boulevard and input regarding an existing billboard on the site. 5. Comp Plan Update – Community Development (90 minutes) Review draft of the St. Louis Park 2040 Comprehensive Plan. Communications/Meeting Check-In – Administrative Services (5 minutes) Time for communications between staff and Council will be set aside on every study session agenda for the purposes of information sharing. Written Reports 6. Buck Thorn Removal 7.France Avenue Sidwalk Project Update: 4018-2000 Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 1) Page 3 Title: Future Study Session Agenda Planning May 21 and May 29, 2018 Study Session Prioritization & Projected Discussion Timeline Priority Discussion Topic Comments Date 4 Revitalization of Walker/Lake Area Part of Preserving Walker Building Reports: 8/28/17, 9/25/17, 1/22/18, Design Study 2/12/18, update 4/23 Ongoing 4 Finalize Outcomes of Council Retreat (Includes Norms) Reviewed on 5/7; Final draft being prepared for Council approval TBD 4 Establish a Local Housing Trust Fund 5/14/18 4 Communication to HRC on Council Expectations Most recently discussed on 9/11/17; 6/4/18 4 Race Equity/Inclusion Courageous Conversations Most recently discussed on 9/11/17; 6/4/18 4 Creating an Affirming Environment for Transgender Individuals 6/4/18 4 Zoning Guidelines for Front-facing Buildings w/ Windows Not Papered Over TBD 4 Policy for Funding Non-profits Discussed on 4/9/18. Staff following up. TBD 3 Crime Free Ordinance / Affordable Housing Strategies 5/14/18 3 The Nest Postponed per their request 5/29/18 3 Off-sale Liquor License Regulations 5/29/18 3 Develop a Youth Advisory Commission 6/4/18 3 Discuss & Evaluate Our Public Process July, 2018 3 Living Streets Policy After Vision 3.0 work is completed 2nd Qtr 2018 3 Historical Society Space Part of Walker Bldg discussions on 8/28/17 & 11/20/17, 12/11/17, 4/23 Ongoing 3 Design Guidelines - New Home Construction TBD 3 Mandatory Minimum Wage Ordinance TBD 3 Easy Access to Nature, Across City, Starting w/ Low-income Neighborhoods TBD 2 SEED’s Community Green House / Resiliant Cities Initiative TBD 2 Bird Friendly Glass TBD 2 Dark Skies Ordinance (Light Pollution) TBD 2 Community Center Project TBD 2 Revitalization of Monkey Island TBD ? Regulating Firearms 5/21/18 Priority Key 5 = High priority/discuss ASAP 4 = Discuss sooner than later 3 = Discuss when time allows 2 = Low priority/no rush 1 = No need to discuss Meeting: Study Session Meeting Date: May 14, 2018 Discussion Item: 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: Common Sound Music Festival Update RECOMMENDED ACTION: None at this time. Beth El Synagogue and Benilde - St. Margaret’s Catholic School have partnered to host an inaugural outdoor summer concert, Common Sound Music Festival, on Sunday, June 17, 2018. Members from Beth El and Benilde - St. Margaret’s Catholic School will be in attendance to introduce themselves to City Council and share information about the event. POLICY CONSIDERATION: Does the council need any other information regarding this event? SUMMARY: Beth El Synagogue and Benilde-St. Margaret’s, along with Sue McLean & Associates, are hosting a live outdoor concert at the Beth El Synagogue parking lot on Sunday, June 17, 2018. The Common Sound Music Festival will feature artists Amanda & Berek Awend, Big Wu and the Gin Blossoms. Doors open at 3:00 p.m. with music from 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. There will be beer, wine (council approval required for temporary liquor license) and kosher food available for purchase. This event is rain or shine. Beth El delivered postcards to residents within a 2,000 ft. radius of the event containing information about the concert and an open house that was held Thursday, April 26, from 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. In addition to the postcard, members from Beth El have met with representatives from Lake Forest, Birchwood, Fern Hill and Blackstone neighborhoods. The organizers have been working closely with the city on logistics and safety. Staff from a number of departments including public safety and operations have been meeting to review logistics and provide information to Beth El and Benilde – St. Margaret’s for their event. The purpose of the study session discussion is to have members from Beth El and Benilde – St. Margaret’s provide council with an update on the planning for their event. Council will be provided with a copy of the site plan, from the event planners, at the meeting. FINANCIAL OR BUDGET CONSIDERATION: Not applicable. VISION CONSIDERATION: St. Louis Park is committed to being a connected and engaged community. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: None Prepared by: Maria Carrillo Perez, Management Assistant Reviewed by: Nancy Deno, Deputy City Manager/HR Director Approved by: Tom Harmening, City Manager Meeting: Study Session Meeting Date: May 14, 2018 Discussion Item: 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies RECOMMENDED ACTION: None at this time. The purpose of the report is to review, examine and update the council on the status of a number of housing related strategies and tools; including the city’s Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and Naturally Occurring Affordable Housing (NOAH) Preservation Strategies. POLICY CONSIDERATION: Is the city’s Crime Free Housing ordinance providing for responsible management of rental property and ensure the quality of life of the adjacent rental community and neighbors? Does the council support further research related to establishing a local housing trust fund? Are there additional strategies or tools to create new affordable housing or preserve NOAH the council would like to explore further? SUMMARY: The city council places a high priority on ensuring a balanced and enduring housing stock that offers a wide variety of housing types to meet the life-cycle needs of all of St. Louis Park households at all income levels. At the April 14 council study session review of the draft 2040 Comprehensive Plan housing goals and strategies, the council confirmed their continued support for promoting affordable housing options, including both creation of new units and preservation of existing affordable units. An early housing initiative by the council included the adoption of the Crime Free/Drug Free and Disorderly Lease Ordinance in an effort to enhance the rental licensing program and help prevent or resolve behavior concerns in rental properties. The ordinance addresses behaviors that affect the quality of life for the rental community and other neighbors. Staff will be providing an overview on the ordinance and review outcomes with the council at Monday’s meeting. In more recent years the council has adopted policies, approved ordinances and implemented programs that have resulted in both the creation of new affordable housing opportunities and the protection of low- and moderate-income rental households. Initiatives have included: • Adoption of the Inclusionary Housing Policy; • Approval of the Kids in the Park shallow rent subsidy program; and • Approval of the Tenant protection ordinance. Staff will provide an update of these and other strategies and tools currently being explored including the Legacy Program, the Rental Rehab Finance program and Affordable Housing Trust Funds. FINANCIAL OR BUDGET CONSIDERATION: None at this time. VISION CONSIDERATION: St. Louis Park is committed to providing a well-maintained and diverse housing stock. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: Discussion St. Louis Park City Code: Sec. 8-328, Sec. 8-331 St. Louis Park Crime Free Rental Housing Lease Addendum Prepared by: Michele Schnitker, Housing Supervisor Reviewed by: Karen Barton, Community Development Director Approved by: Tom Harmening, City Manager Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 3) Page 2 Title: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies DISCUSSION BACKGROUND: Affordable Housing Strategies and Tools: Throughout 2017 the council reviewed and discussed various strategies and tools to create and preserve affordable housing. The council identified four NOAH preservation strategies for further consideration and directed staff to convene a workgroup with representatives from MN Multi-housing, the SLP rental owners and the affordable housing advocates. The purpose of the group was to discuss the preservation strategies and determine if they could identify any common ground. The group met several times and identified several strategies that all could support. One of the strategies was a tenant protection ordinance that would provide protection to existing residents from rent increases, re-screening and lease non-renewals without cause for a three month period following the sale of a NOAH multi-family residential property. An ordinance enacting this strategy was recently approved by the council and will go into effect July 1, 2018. In addition, the workgroup supported several other strategies including a “legacy” program to preserve affordable properties and a rental rehab program that would provide desirable financing in exchange for rent-restricted units. Staff will review these and other strategies and tools at Monday’s council study session. Staff will also provide an overview of the city’s crime free ordinance and information on locally established Affordable Housing Trust Funds. Crime Free/Drug Free and Disorderly Lease Ordinance: The city council adopted the Crime Free/Drug Free and Disorderly Lease Ordinance in 2007 to enhance the rental licensing program and help prevent or resolve behavior concerns in rental property. The ordinance addresses behaviors that affect the quality of life for the rental community and other neighbors. The owner or property manager must attend an approved Minnesota Crime Free Multi-Housing Training before a rental license is issued. The St. Louis Park police department offers this training and educates owners and managers on the St. Louis Park Crime Free Ordinance. When violations occur the Police Department notifies the property owner or manager. For disorderly use violations, the licensee is notified of the first violation within a 12-month period. The second violation results in notification and requires a written action plan for preventing future occurrences be submitted to the police department. A third violation within 12 months requires the licensee move forward with terminating the lease. In the event of a verified crime or drug occurrence, the licensee must move to terminate the lease for the unit. The program was designed to be an effective and efficient tool in partnering with the hundreds of rental property owners to maintain crime and drug free housing in the city and provide a safe, livable community for our rental community in St. Louis Park. The only time in which the notification and termination of tenancy requirements of the ordinance is applied is when the Police Department verifies that a violation has occurred. Complaints filed by neighbors or adjoining tenants do not constitute verification of a violation. The majority of violations over the past 10 years have been first violations with only a small percentage resulting in a second violation, demonstrating the positive effect the ordinance has had in stopping negative behavior before it results in termination of a lease. A small percentage of violations have resulted in immediate lease termination. Police Chief Mike Harcey and Lieutenant Mike Garland will review the ordinance and violation statistics at the study session. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 3) Page 3 Title: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies Local Housing Trust Fund: Housing trust funds are distinct funds established by city, county or state governments that receive ongoing dedicated sources of public funding to support the preservation and production of affordable housing. Housing trust funds shift affordable housing funding from annual budget allocations to the commitment of a dedicated public revenue. Housing trust funds can also be a repository for private donations, but they are not considered public/private partnerships. The Minnesota Legislature passed a bill in 2017 that allows local communities to establish housing trust funds or to participate in a joint powers agreement to establish a regional housing trust fund. The housing trust fund may be established by ordinance or a joint powers agreement to establish a regional housing trust fund. A local housing trust fund can be, but is not required to be, administered through a nonprofit organization. Money in a housing trust fund may be used only to: (1) pay for administrative expenses, not to exceed 10% of the balance of the fund; (2) make grants, loans, and loan guarantees for the development, rehabilitation, or financing of housing; (3) match other funds from federal, state, or private resources for housing projects; or (4) provide down payment assistance, rental assistance, and homebuyer counseling services. A local government may finance the fund with any money available to the local government, unless expressly prohibited by state law. Potential sources of funding include, but are not limited to: (1) donations; (2) bond proceeds; (3) grants and loans from a state, federal, or private source; (4) appropriations by a local government to the fund; (5) investment earnings of the fund; and/or (6) housing and redevelopment authority levies. Other Minnesota communities with local housing trust funds include Minneapolis, Red Wing, St. Paul and Ramsey County. Update on Affordable Housing Strategies and Tools: • Tenant Protection Ordinance: Second reading approved by the council on April 16. Ordinance published April 26. Effective date of the ordinance is July 1, 2018. Staff drafting informational materials to be distributed starting June 2018. • Legacy Program: Generated as an outcome of the NOAH Preservation Workgroup’s discussion on the NOAH preservation strategies, the workgroup recognized that the majority of owners appreciate and care about their residents and that there are owners that would be interested in creating a “legacy” by preserving their property as affordable housing. The workgroup proposed the creation of a program that could be marketed to owners to make them aware of the financial advantages of transferring their NOAH property to a non-profit preservation buyer. A sub-workgroup was formed with representatives from Minnesota Multi-Housing Association (MMH), preservation buyers, including Aeon, Commonbond and Greater MN Housing Fund and St. Louis Park. With the preservation buyers taking the lead, the group held its first meeting in March and are in the process of drafting informational and marketing materials. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 3) Page 4 Title: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies • Rehab Funding in Exchange for Rent-Restricted Units/4D Tax Classification: The St. Louis Park rental owners and the NOAH Preservation Workgroup endorsed this strategy in theory but felt the terms and requirements of the program will determine if the program will appeal to rental owners. This program may attract medium- and small property owners with less access to capital. The Urban Land Institute (ULI), Family Housing Fund (FHF) and MN Housing have established a workgroup that is establishing a pilot for a rental rehab program targeted at small and mid-size properties, modeled after a current program funded and administered by MN Housing for greater MN. In exchange for attractive rehab financing, properties would be required to set aside a specified number of rent-restricted units. Eligibility for the 4D tax reduced rate classification for qualifying properties that have rent-restricted units may incent more owners to use the program. • 4D Tax Classification: The workgroup also discussed exploring how to expand the 4D tax benefit to provide a greater incentive to leverage commitments from property owners to restrict rents being charged and to accept Housing Choice Voucher participants. The current 4D tax classification provides a property tax break amounting to approximately 40%. Under the current eligibility requirements, a property must restrict rents for at least 20% of the units at a level affordable to households at 60% AMI. Properties also have to receive some form of financial assistance from a federal, state or local government – the amount and purpose of the funding is not defined. The city of Minneapolis recently approved a 4d pilot program that will seek a 10 year commitment from multi-family property owners to restrict at least 20% of their rents to an affordability level of 60% AMI. The city will accept up to 300 units and will cover the $10 per unit application fee for the 4D classification. • Nondiscrimination Based on the Use of Public Rental Assistance: A lawsuit has been filed challenging Minneapolis’ recent adoption of a nondiscrimination ordinance based on the use of public rental subsidy. The ordinance was scheduled to go into effect May 1, 2018. Metro communities are deferring further action related to this policy until the outcome of the lawsuit is known. Although staff proposes that St. Louis Park act similarly and delay further action on this policy until the outcome of the lawsuit is determined, the workgroup did discuss this policy and the rental owners expressed a number of concerns. Owners agreed that there is a lot of misinformation related to the Housing Choice Voucher program requirements but were still hesitant to support a policy that would require nondiscrimination of applicants receiving public rent subsidy. Owners noted that the Minneapolis PHA voucher program processes were not owner friendly and in some cases resulted in the loss of rent as owners waited for inspections and approvals. Although it was noted that Minneapolis has made significant progress in addressing the owners concerns, owners stated that the ease of participating in the program is dependent on the jurisdiction administering the program. St. Louis Park may have a good relationship with the landlords and owners and be responsive to any concerns or issues that arise, but that may not be the case in other communities. • NOAH Sidewalk Network: At the request of council, staff has taken a closer look at the city’s sidewalk network with a racial equity lens. Specifically, staff was asked to locate sidewalk gaps between NOAH properties and transit corridors. After identifying all of the Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 3) Page 5 Title: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies NOAH properties across the city, staff analyzed the existing sidewalk network and created an inventory of locations where new sidewalks could be constructed to make these connections. In all there were 4.42 miles of new sidewalks identified, with a total estimated construction cost of $1,600,000. The next step is to determine a recommended way to build these sidewalk gaps. Consistent with our complete streets policy, we include recommendations regarding sidewalk gap construction with each of our street rehabilitation projects. To determine if this initiative could be addressed through our Pavement Management Program, we overlaid the gap locations with the street segments identified for rehabilitation. After careful review staff determined that we will be able to include the construction of all of these sidewalk gaps into existing projects in the 10 year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). The estimated cost also includes the installation of new street trees in the boulevards adjacent to the sidewalks. • Kids in the Park Shallow Rent Subsidy Program: In partnership with STEP and the St. Louis Park School District, the city created a shallow rent subsidy program to assist low- income St. Louis Park rental households who have children attending school in St. Louis Park or their assigned attendance school, to remain in their current housing. The goal is to address housing instability that keeps students from attending school consistently and diminishes their likelihood of achieving key measures like reading proficiency, a predictor of future success to develop their full potential, children need safe and stable housing, The “Kids in the Park Rent Assistance Program” provides rent assistance to households for up to 48 months. There are currently 9 participants on the program. It is anticipated that the program will be expanded in subsequent years to serve more households. Additional Initiatives: Below are strategies and tools that have been identified for possible further consideration. We are in the initial stages of vetting these strategies to determine feasibility for implementation in St. Louis Park. • Building Permit Fee Reductions for Construction of Affordable Housing • Reduced Rental Licensing Fees for Affordable Housing • 1 for 1 multi-family replacement of NOAH units • City Land Trust for multi-family development • Opportunity for Payment in Lieu – condo new construction NEXT STEPS: In addition to the workgroups for the advancement of the Legacy and the Rental Rehab Finance Programs noted above, staff continues to participate in the ULI of MN facilitated work group of city, state, county, housing industry and advocates interested in creating new affordable housing opportunities and exploring strategies and tools for preserving NOAH properties. A meeting is scheduled for May 17 at which one of the discussion topics is Affordable Housing Trust Funds. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 3) Page 6 Title: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies St. Louis Park City Code BUSINESSES AND LICENSES Subdivision VIII. Rental Housing Sec. 8-328. Crime Free/Drug Free Training. The owner or property manager must have attended an approved training program in The Minnesota Crime Free Multi-Housing Program before any rental license is issued. A Provisional License may be issued for six months to accommodate the training schedule. An owner whose only rental housing is either unoccupied or a dwelling unit homesteaded by a relative is exempted from the training program. (Ord. No. 2334-07, 08-10-2007; Ord. No. 2361-08, 1-1-2009) Sec. 8-331. Crime Free/Drug Free and Disorderly Use Lease Requirements. (a) All tenant leases, except for state licensed residential facilities and subject to all preemptory state and federal laws, shall contain the following Crime Free/Drug Free and Disorderly Use language: (1) Crime Free/Drug Free. 1. Resident, any members of the resident’s household or a guest or other person affiliated with resident shall not engage in criminal activity, including drug-related criminal activity, on or near the premises. 2. Resident, any member of the resident’s household or a guest or other person affiliated with resident shall not engage in any act intended to facilitate criminal activity, including drug-related criminal activity, on or near the premises. 3. Resident or members of the household will not permit the dwelling unit to be used for, or to facilitate criminal activity, including drug-related criminal activity, regardless of whether the individual engaging in such activity is a member of the household, or a guest. 4. Resident, any member of the resident’s household or a guest, or other person affiliated with the resident shall not engage in the unlawful manufacturing, selling, using, storing, keeping, or giving of a controlled substance at any locations, whether on or near the premises or otherwise. 5. VIOLATION OF THE ABOVE PROVISIONS SHALL BE A MATERIAL AND IRREPARABLE VIOLATION OF THE LEASE AND GOOD CAUSE FOR IMMEDIATE TERMINATION OF TENANCY. (2) Disorderly Use. 1. Resident, members of the resident’s household, guests, or other persons under the resident’s control shall not engage in the following Disorderly Use activities: violations of state law relating to alcoholic beverages, trespassing or disorderly conduct; and violation of the St. Louis Park City Code relating to zoning, nuisance and prohibited noise. 2. THREE DISORDERLY USE VIOLATIONS INVOLVING THE SAME TENANCY WITHIN A CONTINUOUS TWELVE MONTH PERIOD SHALL BE A Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 3) Page 7 Title: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies SUBSTANTIAL AND MATERIAL VIOLATION OF THE LEASE AND GOOD CAUSE FOR TERMINATION OF THE TENANCY. (3) Definitions. 1. The term “criminal activity” means prostitution, criminal street gang activity, threatening, intimidating or assaultive behavior, the unlawful discharge of firearms, or any other criminal activity on or near the premises that jeopardizes the health, safety and welfare of the landlord, his agent, other resident, neighbor or other third party, or involving imminent or actual serious property damage. 2. The term “drug related criminal activity” means the illegal manufacture, sale, distribution, use, or possession with intent to manufacture, sell, distribute, or use of a controlled substance or any substance represented to be drugs (as defined in Section 102 of the Controlled Substance Act [21 U.S.C. 802]). (4) Non-Exclusive Remedies. The Crime Free/Drug Free and Disorderly Use provisions are in addition to all other terms of the lease and do not limit or replace any other provisions. (b) These lease provisions shall be incorporated into every new lease for a tenancy beginning January 1, 2008 and all renewed leases by January 1, 2009. (c) Upon determination by the Police Department that a licensed premises or unit within a licensed premise was used in violation of the Crime Free/Drug Free provisions of Subsection (a) (1) herein, the Police Department shall cause notice to be made to the owner and property manager of the violation. The owner or property manager shall notify the tenant or tenants within ten days of the notice of violation of the Crime Free/Drug Free lease language and proceed with termination of the tenancy of all tenants occupying the unit. The owner shall not enter into a new lease for a unit located in the licensed property with an evicted tenant for a period of one year after the eviction. (d) Upon determination by the Police Department that a licensed premises or unit within a licensed premises was used for Disorderly Use activities as set forth in Subsection (a)(2) herein, the Police Department shall cause notice to be made to the owner and property manager of the violation and direct the owner and property manager to take steps to prevent further Disorderly Use violations. (e) If a second Disorderly Use violation as determined by the Police Department occurs within a continuous twelve month period involving the same tenancy, the Police Department shall cause notice to be made to the owner and property manager of the second violation. The owner or property manager shall respond in writing within ten (10) days of receipt of the notice with an action plan to prevent further Disorderly Use violations. (f) If a third Disorderly Use violation as determined by the Police Department occurs within a continuous twelve month period involving the same tenancy, the Police Department shall cause notice to be made to the owner and property manager of the third violation. The owner or property manager shall notify the tenant or tenants within ten days of the Notice of Disorderly Use violation of the Crime Free/Drug Free lease language within the lease and proceed with termination of the tenancy of all tenants occupying the unit. The owner shall not enter into a new lease for a unit located in the licensed property with an evicted tenant for a period of one year after the eviction. (g) The provisions of Subsections (c), (d), (e), and (f) herein do not apply if the determination that the premises have been used in violation of the Crime Free/Drug Free provisions of Subsections (a)(1) and (a)(2) herein originates from a call from or at the request of one or more of the tenants occupying the premises for police or emergency assistance, or in the case of domestic abuse, from a call for assistance from any source. The term “domestic abuse” has the meaning given in Minn. Stat. § 518B.01, subd. 2. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 3) Page 8 Title: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies (h) The owner may appeal the Notice of Violation of the Subsection (c) Crime Free/Drug Free lease language or the Subsection (f) Notice of Disorderly Use Violation by making a written request to the City Manager for a hearing within ten (10) days of receipt of the Notice. The owner shall have the right to appear at the hearing and present any relevant evidence, including the right to challenge the validity of all three incidents forming the basis for a disorderly use notice pursuant to Subsection (f). The City Manager or designee shall promptly conduct the hearing and issue the decision either affirming or reversing the Notice of Violation. If the Notice of Violation is affirmed, the owner will have ten (10) days from receipt of the decision to proceed with termination of the tenancy as required by Subsection (c) or (f). (Ord. No. 2334-07, 08-10-2007; Ord. No. 2361-08, 1-1-2009; Ord. No. 2407-11, 1-13-2012) Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 3) Page 9 Title: Crime Free Rental Ordinance, Affordable Housing Trust Funds and NOAH Preservation Strategies St. Louis Park Crime Free Rental Housing Lease Addendum (1) Crime Free/Drug Free. 1. Resident, any members of the resident’s household or a guest or other person affiliated with resident shall not engage criminal activity, including drug-related criminal activity, on or near the premises. 2. Resident, any member of the resident’s household or a guest or other person affiliated with resident shall not engage in any act intended to facilitate criminal activity, including drug-related criminal activity, on or near the premises. 3. Resident or members of the household will not permit the dwelling unit to be used for, or to facilitate criminal activity, including drug-related criminal activity, regardless of whether the individual engaging in such activity is a member of the household, or a guest. 4. Resident, any member of the resident’s household, or a guest, or other person affiliated with the resident shall not engage in the unlawful manufacturing, sell, using, storing, keeping, or giving of a controlled substance at any locations, whether on or near the premises or otherwise. 5. VIOLATION OF THE ABOVE PROVISIONS SHALL BE A MATERIAL AND IRREPARABLE VIOLATION OF THE LEASE AND GOOD CAUSE FOR IMMEDIATE TERMINATION OF TENANCY. (2) Disorderly Use. 1. Resident, members of the resident’s household, guests, or other persons under the resident’s control shall not engage in the following Disorderly Use activities: violations of state law relating to alcoholic beverages, trespassing or disorderly conduct; and violation of the St. Louis Park City Code relating to prohibited noise. 2. THREE DISORDERLY USE VIOLATIONS INVOLVING THE SAME TENANCY WITHIN A CONTINUOUS TWELVE MONTH PERIOD SHALL BE A SUBSTANTIAL AND MATERIAL VIOLATION OF THE LEASE AND GOOD CAUSE FOR TERMINATION OF THE TENANCY. (3) Definitions. 1. The term “criminal activity” means prostitution, criminal street gang activity, threatening, intimidating or assaultive behavior, the unlawful discharge of firearms, or any other criminal activity on or near the premises that jeopardizes the health, safety and welfare of the landlord, his agent, other resident, neighbor or other third party, or involving imminent or actual serious property damage. 2. The term “drug related criminal activity” means the illegal manufacture, sale, distribution, use, or possession with intent to manufacture, sell, distribute, or use of a controlled substance or any substance represented to be drugs (as defined in Section 102 of the Controlled Substance Act [21 U.S.C.802]). Meeting: Study Session Meeting Date: May 14, 2018 Discussion Item: 4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update RECOMMENDED ACTION: Discuss and provide feedback on the remaining proposed Goals and Strategies of the 2040 Comprehensive Plan. No other action is required at this time. POLICY CONSIDERATION: Are the proposed goals and strategies in keeping with the council’s expectations? SUMMARY: The process of updating the city’s current Comprehensive Plan for 2040 is continuing. The city’s current 2030 Comprehensive Plan can be found on the city’s website at: https://www.stlouispark.org/government/departments-divisions/community- development/previous-comprehensive-plan-efforts Overview: An overview of the goals and strategies for the 2040 Plan are attached. Staff will be discussing the new and/or revised goals and strategies, as highlighted on the attached summary, and will be available to answer questions relating to existing goals and strategies. Revised Land Use and Housing goals and strategies, based on feedback received at the April 16th study session, are attached as well, for reference. Survey: An on-line survey of proposed goals and strategies in the Comprehensive Plan will begin on May 14th. Additional information relating to the survey follows in the discussion section of this report. NEXT STEPS: Staff will be presenting the entire draft 2040 Comprehensive Plan at the City Study Session on May 29th for review and discussion. The Planning Commission will also be provided with the draft Plan on May 30th and will be request to take action on June 6th to recommend council approve sending the draft plan out for review. On June 18, the City Council will be asked to take action to begin the formal 6-month review process with adjacent jurisdictions. During the six-month review period, additional plan modifications and editing can take place. Also during this time Staff will work with the Metropolitan Council on an informal review of the Plan, which will expedite the review process. In December of this year, the City Council will be asked to formally submit the Plan to the Metropolitan Council. Following Met Council’s review, the city will be approved to “place the Plan into effect”, effectively replacing the existing 2030 Comprehensive Plan. FINANCIAL OR BUDGET CONSIDERATION: The funding for the Plan has been allocated in the 2017 and 2018 community development budgets. VISION CONSIDERATION: St. Louis Park is committed to being a connected and engaged community. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: Discussion Comprehensive Plan 2040 Outline Proposed Comprehensive Plan Goals and Strategies Future Schedule for Review Prepared by: Meg J. McMonigal, Principal Planner Reviewed by: Karen Barton, Community Development Director Approved by: Tom Harmening, City Manager Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Page 2 Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update DISCUSSION Goals and Strategies: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Goals and Strategies for the following sections are in order of the attached 2040 Comprehensive Plan outline. Community Input: Neighborhood Planning Workshops were held in November 2017, in addition to an on-line community input survey from which 1,083 responses were received. In follow up to the Workshops and previous on-line survey, the community is invited to participate in another on-line survey that will be available from May 14th for approximately 5 weeks. The survey is being advertised in the Park Perspective, will be sent out to the city’s email lists, neighborhood leaders, and posted on our social media accounts, etc. Following the survey, the information will be compiled and presented to the Planning Commission and City Council for any needed follow up or discussion relating to the draft Comprehensive Plan. In addition, the following meetings have been held with various Boards and Commissions: Planning Commission: •June 7, 2017 – Review of current plan •December 6, 2017 – Introduction of consultant and schedule •February 21, 2018 - Land Use •March 7, 2018 - Housing •March 21, 2018 - Mobility and Land Use •April 4, 2018 – Climate and Energy, Solid Waste, Parks, Open Space and Natural Resources •April 16, 2018 – Water Resources: Water Supply, Sanitary Sewer, Surface Water •May 2, 2018 – Public Health and Safety: Public Health, Inspections, Police, Fire Park and Recreation Advisory Commission: •October 2, 2017 •November 29, 2017 •January 29, 2018 Environment and Sustainability Commission: •November 1, 2017 •January 3, 2018 •March 7, 2018 St. Louis Park School Board: •February 12, 2018 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update St. Louis Park May 8, 2018 St. Louis Park 2040 Comprehensive Plan Outline CHAPTER Goals and Strategies I = Information X = Goals and Strategies Included in Council Report Vision St. Louis Park •Strategic Directions •Key Themes I Who We Are - Demographics I Why We Are A Livable Community A.Planning Context I B.Land Use Plan X X C.Economic and Redevelopment X X D.Housing Plan X X E.Historic Resources I F.Plan By Neighborhood I Mobility: Getting Around in Our Community X X A.Pedestrians B.Bicycles C. Transit D.Highways and Streets E.Freight Rail F.Aviation Where We Gather A.Parks and Open Space X X B.Schools I C.Public Art I Environmental and Sustainability A.Climate and Energy B.Solid Waste X X X X C.Water Resources 1.Water System X X 2.Sanitary Sewer X X 3.Surface Water X X Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 3 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update St. Louis Park May 8, 2018 D.Other utilities I How We Govern A.City Government I B.Public Health and Safety 1.Public Health 2.Inspection Services 3.Police Department Services 4.Fire Department Services X I X X X X X C.Race and Equity X X D.Communications I APPENDICES: •Water Supply Plan •I & I Study •Surface Water Management Plan •Climate Action Plan •Neighborhood Input Report Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 4 St. Louis Park 2040 Comprehensive Plan Proposed Goals and Strategies Goals: shown in bold Strategies: shown lettered A, B, C, etc. Highlighted Goals and Strategies are for discussion at meeting Areas covered (in order): -Economic Development and Redevelopment -Mobility -Parks, Open Space and Natural Resources -Climate and Energy -Solid Waste -Water System -Sanity Sewer -Surface Water -Public Health -Police Department Services -Fire Department Services -Race and Equity Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 5 Economic Development and Redevelopment Goals and Strategies HIGHLIGHTS: Continue to encourage development and redevelopment; added considerations on Climate Action Plan, housing; added a new section to assist the startup, growth, diversification, and expansion of the city’s small businesses. Encourage economic development and redevelopment activities that enhance the overall livablity and vitality of the community A.Maintain and promote economic development financing policies and programs to assist with redevelopment and revitalization of the city’s commercial, office, and industrial areas. B.Encourage sustainable building projects consistent with the city’s Green Building Policy energy savings and water conservation targets, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards, State of Minnesota B3 Guidelines, or comparable green certification applicable for each project’s particular development type. C.Encourage efficient, compact redevelopment that results in the highest and best land uses so as to minimize energy and infrastructure costs. D.Encourage economic development and redevelopment that incorporate Livable Communities planning principles as established in the Land Use section of the 2040 Plan. E.Encourage the development of new market rate and affordable housing which will provide residents with additional housing options, assist in retaining and attracting talent for area employers, and further support local commercial businesses. F.Encourage redevelopment that incorporates efforts to achieve the goals of the Climate Action Plan, such as renewable energy resources, on-site solar energy, participation in community solar, purchase of renewable energy credits through electric utility programs, and other such efforts that reduce energy usage. Foster the expansion, redevelopment and revitalization of the city’s commercial, industrial and business park areas A.Balance available land resources and future growth demands to ensure that the city has an adequate amount of land guided for commercial, office, and industrial uses to maintain a healthy tax base, offer adequate high-quality employment opportunities, and provide desirable goods and services. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 6 B.Encourage and support expansion, redevelopment and revitalization that contribute to a diverse and healthy mix of desirable commercial, office and industrial development types. C.Maintain and expand public infrastructure systems (e.g. streets and utilities) that provide adequate connections and capacities to meet the future needs of the city’s business areas. D.Undertake redevelopment planning studies to explore options and establish plans for redevelopment and revitalization of identified redevelopment study areas. E.Collaborate with property owners and developers in SWLRT station areas to intensify or redevelop business areas consistent with Transit Oriented Development best practices and the city’s LRT station area plans. F.Collaborate with property owners to provide new services, amenities and land uses that strengthen their business area or creatively reuse underutilized business areas. Retain and foster the growth of St. Louis Park’s existing high-quality businesses A.Promote strong relationships between existing businesses, government, and neighborhoods to promote a healthy and compatible working and living environment. B.Support the expansion of existing high-quality businesses that have an environmentally sound track record, provide desirable goods and services, and offer quality jobs (e.g. stable employment and/or attractive wages and benefits). C.Provide public financing policies and programs that assist existing businesses with remaining and/or expanding in St. Louis Park (e.g. tax increment financing, private activity bonds, revolving loan fund). D.Collaborate with agencies that provide education, skill training and job placement to ensure that St. Louis Park provides a sound base of qualified employees for its employers. Assist the startup, growth, diversification, and expansion of the city’s small businesses A.Continue to link small businesses with resources and organizations that provide information and financial assistance needed for the retention and growth of small and locally-owned businesses. B.Enhance opportunities for partnerships between public and private entities that promote economic vitality of small businesses. C.Continue to assist small businesses in identifying appropriate locations within the city. D.Promote small businesses with an emphasis on women, minority and veteran owners to diversify and further strengthen the economic fabric of the city. E.Research, develop and implement innovative and creative programs in which to assist entrepreneurs and small businesses to expand and/or locate in St. Louis Park (i.e., affordable rent programs, grants, loans, incentive programs, etc.). Recruit new businesses that are compatible with and complementary to St. Louis Park’s existing businesses A.Promote St. Louis Park’s strategic benefits as a prospective business location including: its first ring location in the Twin Cities metro area, convenient transportation access Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 7 including easy highway access and the future SWLRT line, a high- quality workforce, and many community amenities. B.Focus the City’s business attraction efforts on industry sectors with a track record of environmental sensitivity and provision of quality jobs (i.e. stable employment and attractive wages and benefits). Such industries include: headquarters and business services, financial services and insurance, health and life sciences; advanced manufacturing and technology. C.Encourage and support the assembly of smaller obsolete business sites into larger sites that can accommodate the development of new buildings to fit contemporary business needs and standards and will attract new businesses to St. Louis Park. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 8 2040 Comprehensive Plan Mobility Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Emphasizing a priority change to prioritize walking first, followed by biking and transit, and then motor vehicles. Mobility System Plan, design, build, and operate the city’s mobility system in a way that prioritizes walking first, followed by bicycling and transit use, and then motor vehicle use A.Incorporate a context-based approach when planning and designing transportation projects. B.Implement the Living Streets Policy throughout all phases of transportation projects and initiatives, including programming, design, and construction into all elements of the public right- of-way. C.Continue to explore and evaluate flexible and innovative designs and seeking guidance from established best practices, to achieve desired outcomes. D.Use the Capital Improvement Program to improve the pedestrian, bicycle, and transit networks. E.Manage the right-of-way to take full advantage of a dynamic urban environment. F.Design transportation infrastructure to support land use goals for compact, accessible, walkable neighborhoods. G.Promote and support adaptation of the community mobility network to take advantage of improved technologies and mobility modes. Ensure the quality and function of the transportation system contributes to the equitable outcomes for all people. A.Prioritize pedestrian needs of underserved populations. B.Promote public awareness of the range of travel choices and the beneficial impacts travel choices have on household finances, personal quality of life, society, and the environment. C.Improve pedestrian, bicycle, and transit way-finding. Eliminate fatalities and serious injuries that are a result of crashes on city streets A.Support Minnesota “Toward Zero Death” program for all users. B.Prioritize safety investments in line with the modal hierarchy established in the Mobility Plan - for pedestrians first, bicyclists and transit riders second, and for people driving in vehicles third. C.Protect pedestrians and bicyclists through design decisions that eliminate fatalities and serious injuries. D.Use enforcement, design decisions, and operational norms to reflect an acute awareness for protecting all users of the mobility systems. E.Prioritize network improvements that will help reduce injuries and deaths at intersections and segments that have proven to be unsafe. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 9 Pedestrian Mobility Provide for the needs of pedestrians, removing barriers to active transportation A.Continue to implement the Connect the Park Plan to construct and maintain a network of sidewalks. B.Continue to build infrastructure for active transportation in conjunction with new development projects. C. Evaluate the number of curb cuts that hamper pedestrian mobility. Critically consider the designation of drop-off zones and other curb-side uses, and evaluate the pedestrian benefits as part of the decision-making process. D.Evaluate options for walking and bicycling year-round when designing roadway. E.Employ traffic calming measures where appropriate. Create a pedestrian network that connects people to their destinations A.Prioritize mobility projects with connectivity between residential neighborhoods, employment, businesses, and transit. B.Continue to identify gaps in the pedestrian network and fill gaps where appropriate, prioritizing areas of the community that need connection alternative mobility systems. C.Continue the city’s maintenance activities to ensure the safe and comfortable use of the pedestrian infrastructure. D.Require pedestrian connections in all new subdivisions, on new streets, and road reconstruction projects. E.Improve way-finding to direct pedestrians to local destinations. Create livable space through pedestrian-scale design of public spaces A.Establish unique and cohesive street character for major community streets, emphasizing safe and comfortable pedestrian and bike connections, landscaping, lighting, and seating areas for the use and enjoyment of pedestrians and bicyclist. B.Incorporate “living streets” design principles into future improvements of the community’s streets in order to enhance the corridors’ appearance and environment. Bicycle Mobility Provide for the needs of bicyclists, removing barriers to active transportation A.Continue to implement the Connect the Park Plan to construct and maintain a network of bikeways. B.Implement emerging best practices in bikeway design. C.Address infrastructure connections for bicycling in conjunction with new development projects. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 10 Ensure that all residents and businesses have access to a well-connected bike network that is easy to navigate and use A.Install way finding along trails and main bicycle routes to direct bicyclists to destinations. B.Support the safety of year-round biking by partnering with Three Rivers Park District to facilitate the removal of snow on the regional trails in St. Louis Park. C.Prioritize bicycling needs of populations who may not have a motor vehicle. Continue to look for more opportunities to expand the network and encourage more people to use the bicycle system A.Continue to work with St. Louis Park schools to identify and promote bike routes to students and parents. B.Consider expanding zoning regulations that promote bicycling, such as the provision of secured storage lockers, and changing and shower facilities. Transit Mobility Ensure that the bus transit and SWLRT network to be accessible to residents and businesses, connecting people to important local and region-wide destinations A.Continue to partner in and prioritize the SWLRT to promote its construction and operation as soon as possible. B.Work with Metro Transit to continually adjust and improve bus transit service in St. Louis Park. C.Support transit networks that promote easy access to jobs, services, churches, schools, and grocery stores. D.Provide comfortable, safe, and accessible transit stops for pedestrians along transit lines that include benches, bike parking, and shelters where feasible. E.Integrate transit through buses, light rail, bike routes, sidewalks and trails throughout St. Louis Park. F.Construct a walkable and connected mobility network near the SWLRT station areas, including smaller block sizes and pedestrian and bicycle connections. Continuously explore, research, and support ways to expand the transit network and maximize service to the community A.Support transit oriented development so people can live and/or work in transit served areas and not be auto-dependent. Use travel demand management strategies to encourage more transit usage in new developments. B.Support efforts focused on reducing single-occupancy vehicle trips, using incentives that encourage the use of public transportation such as Metropass and ridesharing opportunities to increase transit use. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 11 Roadway Mobility Provide well-designed and well-maintained community streets that balance the needs users, residents, businesses, and property owners. A.Identify traffic calming measures such as Living Streets and shared streets in conjunction with upgrades to the mobility system. B.Support connections across freeways that include prioritizing active transportation and transit routes. C.Utilize the city’s Pavement Management Program (PMP) and the annual Municipal State Aid Streets (MSAS) funding allocation to maintain the roadway network in a safe and fiscally responsible manner. D.Recognize the important function of alleys in the mobility network. Consider alleys, especially continuous alleys, to be a valuable resource for access to abutting properties to load/unload, locate utilities, and to dispose of waste. E.Support and participate in the improvements of Hennepin County road segments, including County State Aid Highway (CSAH) 25, Minnetonka Boulevard (CSAH 5), France Avenue (CSAH 17), and Excelsior Boulevard (CSAH 3). F.Support implementation of Hennepin County’s Complete Streets Policy to retrofit County arterial streets within St. Louis Park into complete streets. Work to ensure roadways efficiently connect residents, employees, and visitors to local and regional destinations. A.Monitor updates to the roadway functional classification system within St. Louis Park to maintain a balanced hierarchy of streets for distributing traffic from neighborhoods to the regional mobility systems. B.Consider existing gaps in the roadway network when approving development projects and conducting area-wide planning. C.Prioritize mobility policies that promote accessibility to jobs, services, and amenities via the roadway network; whether it is via walking, biking, transit, or vehicle. D.Promote and support the use of Travel Demand Management (TDM) strategies to achieve more efficient use of the existing community mobility network and reduce congestion problems. E.Support options for improving north-south roadway connectivity when feasible. F.Increase capacity on roadways when needed to improve connectivity of the roadway network, improve isolated connections to regional roadways, or where other measures are impractical to achieve level-of-service standards. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions generated as a result of the roadway network. A.Consider design strategies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, including those that reduce vehicle miles travels, idling, and increase renewable energy use. B.Continue to implement traffic control devices that manage congestion, reducing greenhouse gas emissions. C.Expand regulations that provide for electric vehicle charging ports in new developments and public right-of-way. D.Encourage the use of alternate fuel vehicles. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 12 Improved Technologies and Mobility Modes Position St. Louis Park to benefit from upcoming changes to vehicle ownership models while supporting a shared use mobility network. A.Plan for a shared vehicle fleet and its impact on the built form, including vehicles and bikeshare. B.Establish parking guidelines and requirements that reflect changing vehicle ownership models, both on-street and off-street. C.Provide for carpools, vanpools, and shared mobility vehicles in City-owned parking facilities and encourage private parking facility owners to do the same. D.Evaluate demographics of early adopters of new ownership models and ensure shared mobility benefits are accessible in an equitable way. E.Ensure the City is able to establish agreements with service providers that allow for data to be shared in ways that support the City’s ongoing transportation (mobility?) planning work, focused on equity and access for all. Support the development and deployment of new transportation technologies that positions St. Louis Park to benefit from these advancements. A.Proactively regulate automated vehicles in St. Louis Park while ensuring equitable access to them. B.Proactively plan for impacts of automated and connected vehicles such as the potential need to regulate proximate parking, design narrower travel lanes, design infrastructure with connected capabilities, or make other adjustments to infrastructure design practices and standards. C.Encourage and support electric vehicles by prioritizing associated public and private infrastructure. D.Develop policy that addresses the implications of parking, or lack thereof, in a fully automated future, such as the potential for roving empty vehicles. Freight Rail Minimize impacts of railroad operations in St. Louis Park. A.Invest in safety and crossing improvements along active railroad corridors, with particular attention to where SWLRT, trails and at-grade crossings occur. B.Grade separate trails and roadways near rail lines where applicable and feasible. C.Work to eliminate blocking and switching operations and remove the switching wye in St. Louis Park. D.Address noise and vibration impacts by working with agencies and railroads to implement such measures as improving the tracts, adding buffers, and using other effective measures. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 13 Aviation Ensure the compliance of all City buildings subject to FAA regulations concerning rooftop lighting and coloration. A.Protect navigational aids within St. Louis Park from physical encroachment and electronic interference. B.Encourage the use of noise mitigation measures in new construction, particularly in known noise complaint areas. C.Maintain procedures for ensuring compliance of all buildings subject to FAA regulations concerning rooftop lighting and coloration. Maintain procedures for informing the FAA and MN Department of Transportation of any proposals for structures over 200 feet high. D.Maintain representation on the Noise Oversight Committee of the Metropolitan Airports Commission. Improve access to MSP airport for St. Louis Park residents and businesses through design and implementation of the City’s and region’s transportation plans. A.Continue to partner and urge implementation of the Green Line Extension/SWLRT to provide transit access to the airport. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 14 2040 Comprehensive Plan Parks, Open Space and Natural Resources Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Continue high quality park system, programs and maintenance. Expanding emphasis on natural resources strategies that increase resiliency and combat climate change. Attention to changing community demographics and needs. Overall Goal Continue to provide the high quality system of parks, recreation and open space as a valuable component of strong neighborhoods and a livable, healthy, resilient, vital and equitable community. Preserve an integrated and balanced system of park and open spaces including: •Neighborhood parks to provide park and open space close to residential development. •Community Parks for recreation activities. •Community parks for citywide use for active and passive recreation. •Historical Parks that preserve the history of the area. •Indoor facilities such as the Rec Center and the ROC that provide an aquatic park, skating rinks and meeting room space for the residents. •Environmental areas such as the Westwood Hills Nature Center, providing places for people to experience nature. •Undeveloped open spaces for natural vegetation, linear trails and as a relief for storm water storage. •Regional and local trails. A.Systematically upgrade existing park shelters, playground structures, trails and other park amenities to meet the changing needs of the community, in accordance with the improvement schedule and prioritize improvements that will have the most positive impact on equity outcomes. B.Provide flexible and equitable spaces to accommodate changing trends in demand for park and open space programming. C.Involve the neighborhoods being served and the community to help shape park facilities and the use of open spaces within the City. D.Continue programs to promote volunteer efforts to assist with park amenities and aesthetic appeal. E.Continue to support the park/school partnership and to coordinate park use with educational providers. If in the future any private or non-profit entity no longer wants to Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 15 have the shared use park, the City should consider the opportunity to acquire the property for City park purposes. F.Continue to support partnerships with outside entities. G.Implement established design standards for park buildings, and install art and educational tools in all new and updated facilities. H.Explore the need and options for additional dog parks. I.Carefully evaluate options related to additional land for the park system if an opportunity to acquire either land or a golf course becomes available. J.Consider the opportunity to acquire the property for city park purposes if in the future any private or non- profit entity no longer wants to have the shared use park. Take steps to enhance and improve energy and environmental efficiency in our park areas and park buildings to increase resiliency and combat climate change A.Implement alternative vegetation management within the City’s park areas. B.Periodically conduct energy audits for all park buildings. Utilize audit results when planning for long term capital improvements to the park buildings to ensure compliance with the Energy Action Plan and the Climate Action Plan. C.During redevelopment of any park areas incorporate rain gardens, natural vegetative buffers, and other stormwater management techniques best suited to that park area, where appropriate. D.Increase environmental justice by planting more trees in areas of low income which are often the same areas with the most impervious surfaces. Seek permanent and reliable funding sources for parkland acquisition, capital improvements A.Ensure park dedication or a park dedication fee is collected for all new development where possible. B.Use trail dedication fees and other available funds to add trail links to connect neighborhoods to regional trail systems, parks, schools, and other destinations. C.Maintain a 5-year Improvements Plan to implement planned park improvements. D.Continue partnerships with youth organizations to collaborate on park improvements on a shared-use basis. E.Evaluate and revise the park dedication fee ordinance, and forecast park and trail dedication funds to accurately assess opportunities for funding for capital projects and acquisitions. Recreation Goals Offer physical facilities and recreational, educational, athletic, and special event opportunities for all ages, abilities, and cultural backgrounds. Promote healthy living through the use of park and open spaces for active and passive recreation, organized sports, picnic facilities, and environmental programs, youth and adult leagues and programs, and special events for all, ages, abilities, and cultural backgrounds A.Educate all residents in the community on the wealth of recreational and educational opportunities and pursuits that exist in the parks system, and identify an ongoing process to Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 16 measure cultural responsiveness to ensure the opportunities, activities, and practices are meeting the community’s needs. B.Market programs and facilities using brochures, cable television, the internet and other available promotional avenues in a clear and available manner for all residents. C.Enhance park and trail opportunities for the City with partnerships with other governmental agencies including the Three Rivers Park District and surrounding cities. D.Evaluate and plan for the future demand for available youth and adult park areas. Offer new ideas and facilities that will provide the opportunity to expand entertainment programming, athletic leagues, cultural and artistic opportunities, family schedule-friendly programs, healthy lifestyle/holistic classes, and community wide special events. E.Eliminate as many participation barriers (i.e. disability, financial, cultural, etc.) as possible for the delivery of outstanding service. F.Promote opportunities for people to build connections with their peers, neighbors, and the greater community by supporting intergenerational and intercultural programs, activities, and events. Integrate the trail system through and between parks and open space within the City A.Continue to maintain trails throughout parks in the City, and coordinate capital improvement planning to improve pedestrian and bicycle connections to and within parks. B.Identify high-use trails and consider appropriate trail surface materials to encourage safe, accessible use of the trail. C.Work with Minnehaha Creek Watershed District to develop park trails along Minnehaha Creek, where appropriate. D.Review trails throughout the parks system and consider if connections to the regional trail system or to other parks may be appropriate. E.Provide additional trail connections to major destinations and areas of recreation. F.Provide adequate lighting in parks and on trails. Natural Resource Goals Preserve and improve the natural, ecological and scenic resources within the park and open space system, including water quality, vegetation, wildlife and other environmentally sensitive resources. Establish, retain and maintain parks or open space along and adjacent to lakes, ponds and wetlands for public access, storm water detention, and resource protection A.Make habitat modifications and improvements that will benefit fish, wildlife, and native plantings within the City’s park and open space areas. B.Use Best Management Practices (BMP’s) to buffer lakes, ponds, wetlands and streams with native grasses and other ecologically appropriate plant species. Where possible, use buffers on public lands where appropriate to encourage residents, business owners, and developers to emulate best practices. C.Develop a natural resources inventory for the City’s system of parks and open spaces. D.Continue to increase pursuit of ecosystem approach to natural resource management. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 17 Enhance use of Westwood Hills Nature Center A.Maximize opportunities for enjoyment, educational opportunities, study and observation of nature. B.Minimize disruption to the park to preserve the character of the park’s habitat and associated native flora and fauna. C.Implement the Westwood Hills Nature Center Master Natural Resource Management Plan. D.Construct a new Westwood Hills Nature Center building to meet the current and future needs of the community. Recognize Minnehaha Creek as a shared community asset A.Acquire and maintain public ownership of the banks of the creek and parks along the creek throughout the City where possible. B.Maintain high quality canoe landings and seek to maximize use and access at strategic locations. C.Retain and improve the natural vegetation and amenities along the creek by working with the Minnehaha Creek Watershed district to protect it and provide a natural setting for its enjoyment and use. D.Restrict future development from the shoreline in order to protect the integrity of the creek and natural vegetation. E.Support shared property ownership agreements, including conservation easements, in locations where property owners are interested in improving public access to the Creek. F.Educate the public about the Creek by providing information on its course from Lake Minnetonka to the Mississippi River, the location of access to recreational opportunities on the Creek, and methods to improve its ecological health. Collaboratively maintain the natural environment of the City A.Protect, maintain, diversify, and expand the city’s tree canopy, and continue boulevard tree planting and replacement programs. B.Continue injurious pest sanitation efforts and program and develop partnerships and future invasive pest management plans. C.Continue planting native plant species, including the restoration of wooded and native shorelines, throughout city and in all city park and landscaping efforts. D.Continue the boulevard and park pruning and maintenance plan on a 7-10 year rotation. E.Offer community gardening opportunities as need and interest arises. F.Partner with other public projects to improve the city’s natural resources (Bass Lake Preserve, Minnehaha Creek re-meander). G.Continue to support policies for pollinators throughout the city, and encourage edible and pollinator-friendly landscapes on residential properties. H.Implement tree protection and replacement policies that seek to achieve a one-for-one replacement for trees on private property. I.Periodically revise and update the city’s management and implementation procedures for invasive species. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 18 J.Incorporate diverse cultures into natural resources through community gardens, the summer playground program, FIN program, tree planting and creek clean-up events and presentations at schools and community events. Support policies and practices that will create a more resilient natural environment to combat climate change A.Pursue invasive species management with other organizations and cities. B.Reduce ornamental plantings and plant more native varieties and begin to plant varieties for southern growing hardiness zones. C.Reduce mowing and increase areas of native forbs and grasses. D.Promote alternative and native vegetation planting on residential lots. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 19 2040 Comprehensive Plan Climate and Energy Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Implementing the Climate Action Plan goals; secondarily creating an overall Sustainability Plan. OVERALL GOAL: Achieve carbon neutrality by 2040 by pursuing the following goals in the Climate Action Plan: Climate Action Plan Goals: •Reduce energy consumption in large commercial and industrial (C/I) buildings by 30% by 2030, as compared to the business-as-usual forecast. •Reduce energy consumption in mid-size commercial buildings by 30% by 2030, as compared to the business-as-usual forecast. •By 2030, design all new construction to be net-zero energy (NZE). •Reduce energy consumption in residential buildings by 35% by 2030, as compared to the business-as-usual forecast. •Achieve 100% renewable electricity by 2030. •Reduce vehicle emissions by 25% by 2030, as compared to the business-as-usual forecast. •Achieve a 50% reduction in waste by 2030. Pursue the 2040 Climate Action Plan (CAP) goals, by taking such steps including (partial list from CAP) A.Promote and support retrofitting existing buildings to increase energy efficiency. B.Promote and support updating of building operations to use best management practices for increasing building energy efficiency. C.Engage building occupants and homeowners in sustained behavior changes that increase energy efficiency. D.Strengthen the city’s Green Building Policy and expand the number of new and renovated buildings that are constructed to achieve the Green Building Policy standards. E.Encourage and incentivize community stakeholders to purchase solar power or other renewable purchasing options offered by utilities or developers or install on-site solar energy systems. F.Grow environment and sustainability awareness/outreach for residents and businesses. G.Reduce vehicle miles traveled (VMT) by encouraging residents and businesses to replace existing vehicles with more fuel-efficient models, including electric vehicles (EVs), and by expanding EV charging infrastructure. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 20 Pursue the 2040 Climate Action Plan (CAP) Advanced Strategies A.Explore opportunities for combined heat and power or using thermal energy grids as power supplies. B.Encourage fuel switching from fossil fuels to renewable sources or buying carbon offsets. C.Consider including Scope 3 emissions in future emissions inventories and plan revisions. Develop a 2040 Sustainability Plan that broadens the scope of the Climate Action Plan A.Conduct a sustainability assessment of the city’s existing natural environment, built environment, economic and social systems’ conditions, policies/programs, and interconnections. B.Establish the city’s sustainability vision, guiding principles, and goals. C.Identify key sustainability indicators and measures. D.Create a sustainability plan as a stand-alone plan or integrated into the Comprehensive Plan that establishes sustainability policies/strategies and actions. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 21 2040 Comprehensive Plan Solid Waste Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Increase reduction of solid waste through education to reduce waste, increase recycling and zero waste packaging, using pay-as-you-throw rates, and adopting a waste reduction plan by 2020. Continue to Provide Education & Outreach to Community A. Incorporate recycling and reduction education programs that include innovative or non-traditional methods to reach community members. B. Create and provide multi-lingual education. C. Focus education on event recycling for users of city owned properties. D. Identify opportunities for internal education. Support and Increase Waste Reduction A. Continue to improve and enforce the City’s zero waste packaging ordinance. B. Adopt a waste reduction plan by 2020. C. Continue to adjust city solid waste rates to support pay-as-you-throw rate model. D. Continue to explore deconstruction opportunities in residential and commercial construction and demolition projects. Support Repair/Reuse/Recycling/Composting Markets A. Ensure that city purchases include recycled content. B. Work toward a requirement that Grade 2 compost is used for city parks, roads, private development, and construction projects. C. Develop and implement a soil management policy for any construction projects (public/private) to improve organic content of soil through the use of compost. Increase Recycling & Organics Recycling A. Increase residential organics recycling participation to 80% by 2040. B. Continue to support multi-family recycling by identifying properties to include in residential collection program and research the feasibility of incorporating small dumpster service in future city contracts for small to mid-sized multi-family buildings. C. Educate and enforce the commercial and multi-family recycling requirements of Solid Waste Ordinance. D. Improve public spaces event recycling through increasing availability of recycling containers, improved signage, mobilize volunteers and other best management practices. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 22 2040 Comprehensive Plan Water Supply Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Continue to provide an uninterrupted supply of safe, high quality water. Build on reducing water usage efforts through continued conservation and education in the community. Provide an uninterrupted supply of safe, high quality water to St. Louis Park customers through proper operation and maintenance of the water supply system A.Continue the current preventive maintenance on all water supply and treatment equipment to prevent unexpected breakdowns. B.Continue to evaluate the basic maintenance and operational guidelines to provide responsive and cost-effective maintenance of the Water Supply System. C.Continue to implement the Wellhead Protection Plan. Provide for the treatment and delivery of water in the most energy efficient manner A. Continue to participate in the Xcel Energy time-of-day energy program. B.Conduct periodic reviews of the energy use to insure the energy saving equipment is operating at peak performance. C.Continue to research energy conservation techniques that may apply to the water treatment and delivery system. D.Continue to install variable frequency drives at wells and high service pumps to conserve energy and enhance operational control. Encourage reduced water consumption A.Utilize the water conservation pricing in the rate structure. B.Continue to enforce the mandatory sprinkling restriction through education and enforcement. C.Continue the system-wide leak-detection program. D.Continue education programs related to responsible personal use of water. E.Continue to enforce the installation of water saving fixtures. Provide education to consumers on water supply, treatment and conservation A.Continue presentations to community groups and schools, facility tours, and community events. B.Continue other outreach efforts such as consumer confidence reports, billing inserts, distribution of information through social media. C.Continue to partner with local and national organizations that specialize in water related education. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 23 2040 Comprehensive Plan Sanitary Sewer Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Continued emphasis on operation and maintenance of the local sanitary system, specifically addressing its structural integrity and reducing volume of inflow and infiltration. Provide the community a municipal sanitary sewer collection system that will enable optimum transportation of sewage with minimum interruption A.Continue the four-year cleaning and maintenance program on the main sewer lines and bi- annual maintenance program on the sanitary sewer lift stations. B.Continue to evaluate the basic maintenance and operational guidelines to provide responsive and cost-effective maintenance of the Sanitary Sewer System. Provide current information on the Sanitary Sewer System infrastructure through video inspection A.Continue to evaluate the sanitary sewer lines for structural integrity, inflow and infiltration, using the process to establish a proactive CIP to correct any deficiencies through the most effective methods. Televise every 4 years. B.Incorporate the inspection process with an efficient maintenance program. Continue to Mitigate Inflow and Infiltration in the Sanitary Sewer System A.Implement on-going I/I Mitigation Plan included in this plan. B.Continue to systematically investigate areas of concern identified through flow monitoring. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 24 2040 Comprehensive Plan Surface Water Management Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Proactively work to reduce pollutants from storm water runoff. Enhance floodplain management to better identify flood risks in the community. Proactively work to reduce pollutants from stormwater runoff A.Identify and construct regional treatment facilities. B.Incorporate treatment and Best Management Practices (BMP’s) in pavement management projects. C.Promote and fund water treatment and infiltration projects through the Rainwater Rewards program. D.Partner with private landowners and redevelopment projects to construct regional treatment facilities. Provide education and outreach to community A.Educate and ensure that every person understands the stormwater and natural systems and where stormwater goes. B.Promote the Rainwater Rewards Program. C.Continue to work with Westwood Hills Nature Center programs. D.Sponsor clean up and planting events near surface water resources. . Enhance floodplain management to better identify flood risks A.Delineate floodplain using Atlas 14 rainfall data in stormwater modeling. B.Utilize stormwater models to predict and identify at risk properties and categorize the level of risk. C.Identify regional storage and management solutions. Expand city’s role in erosion and sediment control A.Enforce city rules and requirement for erosion control on both public and private construction projects. B.Continue to maintain and repair existing BMP’s as necessary. C.Enhance the current street sweeping program by increasing frequency and efficiency of sweeping techniques. D.Continue to implement BMPs in all parks and public works maintenance activities. Continue partnerships with Minnehaha Creek Watershed District and the Bassett Creek Water Management Organization on stormwater management Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 25 2040 Comprehensive Plan Public Health Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Revamped to address physical, social and mental well-being. Note a number of recent and new initiatives and partnerships with other organizations and levels of government. Support social and mental wellbeing initiatives that span age and culture A.Prioritize programs that promote health equity for all in the Healthy Living Grant program. B.Continue to support opportunities for children and youth to gain skills, increase self-esteem, and envision a positive future through partnership with organizations such as Children First. C.Engage older residents in community conversations and volunteer opportunities so that they can find fulfillment in ways that benefit themselves and the community. D.Promote volunteerism and community service among people of all ages and cultures by creating and communicating volunteer opportunities within the city. E.Continue to promote opportunities for people to build connections with their peers, neighbors, and the greater community by supporting activities, and events through the support of neighborhood organizations, the neighborhood grant program and the Healthy Living Grant program. F.Continue to celebrate young people’s accomplishments, and promote activities for children and youth to increase their participation in the community through volunteer programs such as the junior naturalist and junior park leader volunteer programs. Support physically healthy communities that span age and culture A.Continue to partner with the school district and support nutritional changes and education in the schools and across the community. B.Conduct a study of food accessibility and security in the community. C.Continue to support community nutrition education through the Healthy Living Grant program. D.Continue to seek ways to offer healthy nutritional options in municipal buildings. E.Continue to engage with the community on needs and desires pertaining to physical wellbeing. F.Continue to seek ways to implement initiatives that support physical activity in St. Louis Park through walking and biking in all parts of the community. G.Continue to support efforts led by the Health in the Park Champions that strengthen the ability of children, youth, families, seniors and people of all ages to participate in their physical health, wellness, and education, and to contribute to the development of a vibrant, growing community. H.Continue to support efforts to reduce exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke in outdoor areas, particularly where vulnerable populations, such as children and seniors, are likely to be present. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 26 Continue the Health in the Park initiative to support healthy growth, healthy aging, and healthy lifestyles for all A.Continue to grow the Health in the Park Champion Program, engaging with community members to adopt healthy and active lifestyles to improve their general physical and mental health and well-being and to promote healthy aging for all ages. B.Promote access to affordable opportunities for people to participate in fitness and recreational activities and to enjoy the outdoors. C.Support connections and opportunities that serve the homeless, mentally ill, and chemically dependent populations through the Health in the Park program. D.Continue to grow the Health in the Park initiative in partnership with the school district and other community organizations who wish to advance the wellbeing of those in the city. E.Expand reach of the Health in the Park program ensuring equitable communication and opportunity for participation. Consult the Climate Action Plan to increase resiliency and adaptability to the health effects of climate change A.Address prospective health concerns related to climate change and the impact of extreme weather conditions on community members. Improve regional collaboration around health and human services A.Continue to be a member of county-wide initiatives such as Active Living Hennepin Communities and seek ways to collaborate across communities on healthy living activities and initiatives. B.Support and make connections with community organizations and other jurisdictions that advocate for strong health, human service, and public safety systems, including services for mental health and substance abuse in partnership with the Health in the Park initiative. C.Continue to address health issues in the community, with attention to helping provide information on resources for seniors, and vulnerable and isolated populations. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 27 2040 Comprehensive Plan Police Services Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Continue to use Community Oriented Policing to emphasize safety and prevent crime through building relationships and assisting people in making connections to needed services. Continue to emphasize safety and the prevention of crime and disorder through the use of the Community Oriented Policing philosophy A.Develop crime prevention partnerships with our schools, businesses, neighborhoods and places of worship. B.Continue employee development in Fair and Impartial Policing and Procedural Justice. Build problem-solving relationships with people in the community. Continue to encourage neighborhood involvement and partnerships to promote a safe and healthy community A.Provide education on the role of the police department in the community through the New Americans Academy, Citizens Academy, and School Resource Officers. B.Building strong neighborhoods through National Night Out, Neighborhood Watch programs and the Neighborhood Associations. C.Enhanced Community engagement activities such as Coffee with a Cop and our Cops N Kids programming. D.Continue to partner with Hennepin County in the Joint Community Police Partnership to enhance communication and understanding between law enforcement officers and multicultural residents. Expand the ability of city staff to solve problems, decrease incidents of crime and disorder and assist people in making connections to needed services A.Identify and address quality of life issue in the community through community surveys and neighborhood meetings. B.Engage other City departments, community members, and local businesses to assist in crime prevention. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 28 2040 Comprehensive Plan Fire Department Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Continue emphasis on fire prevention and risk reduction. Address community health issues to connect people to services, and reduce costs and inefficiency. Build a resilient St Louis Park through an emphasis on prevention and community risk reduction A.Continue as an active participant to advance racial equity within St Louis Park by training and the continued use of tools to ensure consistency and effectiveness in providing the best service in the most equitable way. Protect the community and maintain a healthy, safe environment for city residents and businesses A.Continue to provide leadership, mentorship and accountability that is flexible to meet changing community needs, focused on developing and preparing new leaders for the future while maintaining accountability to the community. B.Maintain sufficient emergency response equipment, apparatus and staffing levels to ensure community protection, provide for firefighter safety and wellbeing and plan for changes in demand for service. C.Continue to respond to and address health issues in the community. Pilot cost saving projects in the rapidly growing field of mobile integrated healthcare. Improve access to health care for all residents, lower the costs, and use the appropriate care for the type of call. D.Use all-hazards approach to emergency management and crisis in order to be prepared for any variety of incidents and disasters. Plan and prepare to be able to provide appropriate response and be resilience when the community is most vulnerable. Encourage and promote cost-effectiveness and efficiency in our service delivery and eliminate redundancy when appropriate A.Training Provide oversight and management for all Fire Department training and educational programs to ensure that the local, state, and federal mandates are met. B.Revenue Enhancement Identify and implement available sources of revenue in order to fund operational and structural improvements, and to lessen the burden on taxpayers. Seek to capture additional revenues through the expansion of contract services, enhanced reimbursable services and development of new value- added services for other public and private sector entities. C.Technology Continue to leverage technology in in fire services to help keep our community and staff safe. Continue to build relationships within the community and promote neighborhood involvement and partnerships to promote a safe and healthy community A.Collaborate and cooperate in a positive manner with the community as a whole. Continue to capitalize on employing the abundance of healthcare resources in our service to the community. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 29 2040 Comprehensive Plan Racial Equity Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: New section to create a just and inclusive community for all; ensure racial equity in city service and programs; and increase opportunities in the city for communities of color and indigenous people. Break down barriers in creating a just and inclusive community for all A.Continue and expand pipelines and programs for communities of color and indigenous people to be involved in and take on city leadership roles. B.Consider people of color-owned and indigenous-owned small businesses and services in city purchasing practices and contracts where possible. C.Expand racial equity conversations within all areas of city business. Ensure racial equity in city services and programs to make a tangible difference for all A.Apply a racial equity lens to all city work and city decisions. B.Build a city workforce that reflects the racial make-up of our community at all levels in the organization. C.Support city work areas and departments with new resources to engage and expand understanding and skill sets around racial equity. D.Establish a racial equity assessment program to review the city’s racial equity work. Continue to create opportunities to build social capital through community engagement A.Foster and facilitate transparency between community and the city. B.Build strategies and opportunities to reach historically unheard voices and unseen communities within St. Louis Park. C.Build trust and deeper connections through outreach and community engagement within communities of color and indigenous people. D.Connect and engage with St. Louis Park School District and other community organizations to meet the needs of current and future community. E.Encourage Neighborhood Associations to deepen their reach and connections within the community. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 30 2040 Comprehensive Plan Land Use Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Create new Transit-oriented Development (TOD) land use category for LRT station areas; increase density in residential areas to allow additional types of housing, including accessory housing units and duplexes in low density areas. Add strategies to explore Form-based and Transitional Industrial zoning. Livable Communities Goals Provide attractive public streets, spaces and facilities that contribute to creating connections, a strong sense of community, and opportunities for community interaction. A.Establish unique and cohesive street character for major community streets, emphasizing safe and comfortable pedestrian and bike connections, landscaping, lighting, and seating areas for the use and enjoyment of the public. B.Create well-defined community gateways at appropriate points where major streets cross the City’s municipal boundary, using location appropriate signage, public art, public plazas, and architecturally significant buildings. C.Incorporate “complete streets” design principles into future improvements of the community’s streets to implement planned multi-modal transportation networks and to help achieve the city’s goals to reduce vehicle emissions and provide a more equitable system of transportation options. D.Provide pedestrian and bicycle pathways that connect key departure points and destinations throughout the City and require installation of identified connections during the redevelopment process. E.Promote high quality design of public and private open spaces that will benefit anticipated users with proper consideration given to use, design, maintenance, appearance, location, and accessibility of the space. F.Encourage placement of artwork and amenities throughout the City to help increase civic prominence and a unique sense of place where appropriate. G.Continue to use appropriate outdoor lighting for illumination of streets, parking lots, and other public and private areas. H.Incorporate “living streets” design principles into future improvements of the community’s streets in order to enhance the corridors’ appearance and environment. I.Continue to reduce the level of obtrusive signage within the City by promoting a balance between aesthetics, safety, and communication needs. J.Work with internal and external partners to ensure that roadway and pedestrian facilities, including bridges, located in the City are functionally and aesthetically Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 31 K.Continue to achieve high quality design standards for the exterior appearance of public structures. L.Establish a timetable and implementation strategies to bury utilities. Continue to require the undergrounding of utilities in all new developments and redevelopment projects. Promote building and site design that is creates a connected, human scale, multi-modal, and safe environment for people who live and work here. A.Encourage quality design in new construction such as building orientation, scale, massing, and pedestrian access. B.Encourage new buildings to orient to walkable streets with appropriate building height to street width ratios. C.Revisit the City’s architectural control ordinance ensuring that it provides clear direction to developers and enhances the visual quality and livability of the City. D.Require parking lots to be separated from sidewalks and roadway facilities with appropriate landscaping, street walls or berms, and curbs. E.Continue to enforce parking lot standards that address surfacing, light standards, tree canopy, and heat island reduction. F.Incorporate Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles and practices into building and site design to maximize visibility and eyes on the street. Commercial & Office Land Use Goals Preserve and enhance community commercial centers that offer desirable and complementary commercial retail and services for the community’s residents, workers, and visitors A.Minimize the adverse impacts associated with large community commercial centers using design, performance standards, site planning techniques, minimizing surface parking, buffering, and traffic management. B.Ensure that community commercial centers contribute to an aesthetically positive identity for the community. C.Integrate community travel routes within commercial centers in order to improve overall multi-modal safety, access and circulation around and through the centers. D.Encourage infill development and aesthetic improvements to commercial surface parking lots in order to enhance adjacent public streets and sidewalks and more efficiently utilize commercial land. E.Promote the inclusion of office employment uses within or adjacent to large commercial developments to strengthen the functionality and vitality of community commercial centers. Create commercial corridors that are functional, vibrant, environmentally sustainable, and present an aesthetically positive identity for the community A. Minimize the adverse impacts associated with commercial corridor development using design, performance standards, site planning techniques, and buffering. B.Enhance commercial corridors’ compatibility with nearby residential areas. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 32 Preserve, revitalize and foster neighborhood commercial nodes that provide essential neighborhood commercial services, unique neighborhood identity, and neighborhood gathering opportunities A.Encourage infill and redevelopment in neighborhood commercial nodes that is neighborhood scale in building size, architecture, and orientation to the street. B.Implement convenient pedestrian access to and within the neighborhood commercial nodes from adjacent neighborhoods and transit stops. C. Re-guide or rezone targeted commercial nodes in order to require a mix of commercial and employment or residential uses when they redevelop. D.Consider rezoning certain commercial areas or small commercial sites that abut residential properties from General Commercial to Neighborhood Commercial to reduce the potential size and intensity of future buildings and commercial uses. E.Re-guide under-performing commercial nodes to medium or high density residential to encourage redevelopment. F.Prepare small area plans for commercial nodes and corridors where the appropriate future land uses are unclear, where significant changes are anticipated, and where additional guidance is needed. Preserve and enhance office/medical centers to retain and grow the community’s employment opportunities, tax base, and convenient access to desirable services A.Support expansion of existing medical centers and supportive uses. B.Support new and expanded office development. C. Re-guide or rezone targeted commercial corridors from general commercial to office in order to promote redevelopment. D.Integrate community travel routes within office and medical centers in order to improve overall multi-modal safety, access and circulation around and through the centers. Industrial & Business Park Land Use Goals Protect and enhance the viability of the City’s designated industrial and employment areas through reinvestment in long-term industrial areas, and adaptive reuse and eventual redevelopment in transitional industrial areas A.Protect planned industrial areas from encroachment by non-industrial and incompatible uses. B.Encourage and support the appropriate evolution and expansion of individual industrial businesses. C.Support new industrial land uses that are able to minimize negative environmental impacts and nuisances to surrounding land uses. D.Promote and support the transition and eventual redevelopment of physically and economically obsolete or underutilized industrial properties. E.Consider creating a Transitional Industrial zoning district and rezoning suitable redevelopment properties to Transitional Industrial. F.Enhance industrial areas’ compatibility with nearby residential neighborhoods. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 33 G.Prepare small area plans for both reinvestment industrial areas and transitional industrial areas where significant changes are anticipated. Promote the development of business park land uses in designated employment areas as a way to expand the City’s employment base and opportunities, increase the City’s tax base, and meet the changing market and technological needs of the business sector A.Promote business park developments that utilize more efficient land use and building designs than traditional industrial development, such as multi-story buildings, multi- tenant buildings, and structured parking. B.Encourage and support new business park developments that are designed as employment centers that are integrated into the community with strong connections to adjacent public streets and spaces, natural features, transit, and other community amenities. C.Require that new business park developments provide efficient and attractive parking designs, appropriate landscaping, and high quality building architecture. D.Allow limited commercial and service uses that provide valuable services to, and extend hours of activity within, employment centers without eroding the employment focus of these areas, sites and buildings. Residential Land Use Goals Create a mix of residential land uses and housing types to increase housing choices, including affordable housing, and increase the viability of neighborhood services through redevelopment or infill development A.Engage the community to determine how to allow a broader range of housing types and densities within and adjacent to existing low density residential neighborhoods that are complementary and compatible with the existing neighborhood character. B.Promote and support the development of medium and high density residential land uses near commercial centers and nodes. C.Ensure that new and redeveloped medium and high density residential land uses are located within walking distance of transit and commercial services. D.Engage the community to explore how to increase the mix of housing types near transit corridors, parks and commercial nodes/corridors. Preserve and enhance the livability and unique character of each neighborhood’s residential areas A.Promote maintenance and reinvestment of existing residential land uses that have experienced deferred maintenance, deteriorating property values, high vacancy rates, or reuse opportunities. B.Require the creation of appropriate and effective buffer or transition areas between different land use types. Public Land Use Goals A.Ensure access to public land, parks, open space and facilities by the entire community, including children, adults, the elderly, those in multi-family housing, people of color, and those with mobility challenges. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 34 B.Maintain accessibility to community facilities and public places consistent with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). C.Consider increasing natural environment areas on public land. Mixed-Use Goals Continue to enhance the Park Commons area as St. Louis Park’s “town center” A.Promote and support the redevelopment of the remaining designated redevelopment sites in the Park Commons area with mixed-use buildings to strengthen the area’s function as the “town center.” B.Ensure that future redevelopment provides similar building forms and densities that will complement the character of the “town center.” C.Require that future redevelopment is designed with buildings that are oriented to the public streets and spaces that are the heart of the “town center.” D.Encourage integrating community travel routes within the area in order to improve overall multi-modal safety, access and circulation around and through the area. E.Engage the community to update the Park Commons West Master Plan and implementation strategies. Pursue redevelopment of future light rail transit station areas as transit-oriented, high density, well-connected, mixed-use centers A.Promote and support the Wooddale Station Area as a transit-oriented mixed-use neighborhood. B.Promote and support the Beltline Station Area and Louisiana Station Area as primarily transit-oriented, mixed-use employment centers. C.Require transit-oriented development on properties near future light rail transit stations consistent with station area framework plans. D.Consider adopting form-based codes or similar zoning amendments to help implement station area framework plans. Expand the development of mixed-use districts within St. Louis Park to create a more livable and connected community A.Encourage and support mixed-use infill and redevelopment when compatible with existing or surrounding planned land uses. B.Expand the distribution of mixed-use redevelopment in neighborhood commercial nodes and along commercial corridors to the broader community. C.Promote and support reinvestment in the Historic Walker-Lake area as a mixed commercial/industrial district that is compatible with its unique character and scale. D.Complete a small area plan for the Historic Walker-Lake area. E.Promote and support mixed-use redevelopment in The West End to strengthen its role as a unique and dynamic place to live, work, shop, and play in the metropolitan area. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 35 2040 Comprehensive Plan Housing Goals and Strategies: HIGHLIGHTS: Allow Accessory Housing Units and two-family units in low-density residential areas. Address rental housing stock. Continue to develop additional strategies to ensure long term housing affordability. The City of St. Louis Park will promote and facilitate a balanced and enduring housing stock that offers a continuum of diverse life-cycle housing choices suitable for households of all income levels including, but not limited to affordable, senior, multi-generational, supportive and mixed-income housing, disbursed throughout the City. A.Create a broad range of housing types to provide more diverse and creative housing choices to meet the needs of current and future residents. B.Review existing policies, programs and regulations to remove barriers to innovative and creative housing options. C.Ensure new housing policies promote fair and equitable housing choices. D.Use data and research to guide and evaluate housing priorities, policies, and programs. E.Use infill and redevelopment opportunities to assist in meeting housing goals. F.Create policies, tools and strategies to promote the goals of the city’s Climate Action Plan, encouraging energy efficiency and reducing energy consumption in residential properties. G.Create senior housing opportunities: both market rate and affordable, homeownership and rental, and active and supportive. Single Family Homes: The city is committed to creating, preserving, and improving the city’s single-family housing stock. A.Promote the creation of family-sized, owner-occupied, single-family homes that meet the needs and desires of current and future residents through the expansion of existing homes and through construction of new homes. B.Proactively address substandard housing properties through code enforcement and public or private redevelopment activities such as acquisition, demolition and housing replacement. C.Promote high-quality architectural design standards of homes through the use of good design practices which are complementary and compatible with the neighborhood, utilizing quality materials and superior construction. D.Allow for Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) in all low-density residential areas. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 36 E.Allow for two-family dwelling units (twin homes and duplexes) on appropriately-sized lots in low density residential areas. Multi-Family: The city is committed to promoting quality multi-family developments, both rental and owner occupied, in appropriate locations, including near transit centers, retail and employment centers and in commercial mixed use districts. A.Promote the preservation and maintenance of existing multi-family housing stock. B.Promote high-quality architectural design in the construction of new multi-family developments. C.Be proactive in analyzing and guiding redevelopment opportunities for multi-family developments. D.Increase densities and housing options on high-frequency transit routes and near rail stations. Residential Rental Housing: The city is committed to creating, preserving and improving the city’s rental housing stock. A.Ensure rental housing is well-maintained and safe through policies and programs for property owners including building inspections, education and rehabilitation resources. B.Promote the inclusion of family-sized units (2 and 3 bedroom) in newly constructed multi- family developments. C.Minimize the involuntary displacement of people of color, indigenous people and vulnerable populations, such as low-income households, the elderly and people with disabilities from their communities as neighborhoods grow and change. Home Ownership: The city is committed to promoting home ownership, including affordable homeownership options and exploring traditional and non-traditional owner-occupied housing options such as: row houses, courtyard housing, high-rises, live-work units, 3-story homes, co-housing, Land Trust, Habitat sponsored homes, and multi-generational housing. A.Promote and facilitate a balanced and sustainable housing stock to meet diverse needs for today and in the future. B.Continue promoting first-time home buyer, homeownership counseling, down payment, and other assistance programs. C.Expand homeownership opportunities and improve access to homeownership, especially for low-income residents, people with disabilities, and people of color. D.Explore strategies and tools to prevent loss of affordable homeownership opportunities, especially near light rail transit station areas. Affordable Housing: The city is committed to promoting affordable housing options for low- and moderate-income households. A.Ensure affordable housing is disbursed throughout the city and not concentrated in any Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 37 one area of the city. B.Continue to support the preservation of naturally-occurring affordable housing. C.Promote the inclusion of affordable housing opportunities in new developments, including in developments located near the Southwest Light Rail Transit Corridor and other transit nodes, retail and employment centers and commercial mixed-use districts. D.Pursue policies, tools and programs to ensure long-term housing affordability for households at or below 30, 50, 60 and 80% of AMI. E.Pursue innovative housing strategies to maximize the creation and preservation of affordable housing: o Continue the implementation of the Inclusionary Housing Policy. o Support shallow rent subsidy programs to promote the ability of rental households to secure and maintain stable housing (such as Kids in the Park). o Develop additional strategies to ensure long-term housing affordability, such as the city’s Tenant Protection Ordinance, non-discrimination of rental subsidy, reductions in fees, incentives, and others. o Expand landlord participation in the Housing Choice Voucher Program. o Continue and strengthen partnerships with local nonprofits who are addressing housing needs and challenges in St. Louis Park, including St. Louis Park Emergency Program, Community Action Program-Hennepin County, Project for Pride in Living and others. §Partnership support may include funding to carry out the tasks of the Housing Authority or city to preserve housing & avoid displacement of citizens. o Continue acceptance and support of transitional and supportive housing programs for specialized groups and affordable multifamily housing providers. o Promote safe, stable and affordable housing opportunities and strategies for homeless youth, singles, and families. Continue to support households who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, through programs such as the Stable HOME program and STEP Emergency Program. o Continue to engage in regional dialog and collaboration to expand and maximize affordable housing resources and tools at the local, regional, state and federal levels. F.Continue successful administration of the Housing Authority’s core federally funded rental assistance programs, including maximizing program utilization, ensuring sound fiscal policies, securing renewal funding through the submission of competitive grant applications, and maintaining and improving the Public Housing properties. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 38 Preservation, Safety and Sustainability: The city is committed to ensuring all housing is safe and well maintained. A.Strengthen the city’s single- and multi-family home maintenance and rehabilitation programs. B.Preserve and enhance housing quality and design through code enforcement and the promotion of housing improvement programs related to home rehabilitation, design and housing safety. C.Encourage the use of green building practices, energy-efficient products, and sustainable methods in both single-family and multi-family housing construction. D.Proactively address health hazards in housing and advance design that supports physical and mental health. E.Strengthen neighborhoods and neighborhood amenities to encourage residents to stay and reinvest in St. Louis Park. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 39 Comprehensive Plan 2040 - Tentative Review Schedule Date Topics /Activities Feb 21 Land Use March 7 Housing March 21 Land Use and Mobility -City Council invited April 4 Climate and energy Parks and Recreation Solid Waste -Parks and Recreation Advisory Commission and Environment & Sustainability Commission invited April 16 City Council Study Session •Housing •Land Use April 18 Surface Water, Water Supply, Sanitary Sewer May 2 Public Health and Safety, Plan by Neighborhood May 14 – June 18 Additional Community Engagement Survey May 14 City Council Study Session - Goals and Strategies May 15 Goals and Strategies on Website; share with Commissions May 16 Remaining sections May 29 City Council Overall Plan Review May 30 Planning Commission Overall Plan Review June 6 Planning Commission recommendation to send out for review June 18 City Council action to send out for review November Planning Commission Public Hearing December City Council Action to formally submit Plan to Met Council Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 4) Title: 2040 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 40 Meeting: Study Session Meeting Date: May 14, 2018 Written Report: 5 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: Special Assessment Policy – Sewer and Water Availability Charges RECOMMENDED ACTION: None at this time. This report has been prepared in response to a council directive to develop a policy for assessing the cost of Sewer Availability (SAC) and Water Availability Charges (WAC). POLICY CONSIDERATION: Is the proposed assessment policy consistent with the city council’s intent? SUMMARY: The city council directed staff to draft a policy to guide responses to petitions for special assessments against private property in order to defer the costs of the Metropolitan Council’s sewer availability charges (SAC) and City of St. Louis Park’s water availability charges (WAC). The city collects SAC and WAC at the time that building permits or certificate of occupancies are issued. The Metropolitan Council determines the number of SAC units that are due for a project based on the use and proposed building plans. A SAC unit is the equivalent of a single family house. The city’s assessment policy was last updated in 2016 and adopted by resolution. It generally addresses assessments for public improvement projects. It also addresses fire sprinkler systems installations in private buildings. The draft policy would allow property owners to petition the city to have costs associated with SAC and WAC assessed against their property, in order to defer payment of up to 25 SAC units over a term of either one year, five years or ten years. The draft policy proposes to limit eligibility to only properties that are occupied by a non-profit organization engaged in works to serve a public purpose, such as a charitable organizations or organizations that benefit veterans of the United States Armed Forces. Also, only the SAC and WAC associated with the non-profit organization’s proposed use would be eligible. The city council approved a similar petition from the Paul Revere Masonic Center LLC to assess the SAC and WAC for 14 SAC units that were due for the American Legion’s proposed use. FINANCIAL OR BUDGET CONSIDERATION: The 2018 Metropolitan Council’s SAC rate is $2,485 per SAC unit. The city’s 2018 WAC rate is $750 per SAC unit. The 25 SAC unit cap limits an individual petitioner’s request to $80,875 in 2018. The city does not anticipate frequent petitions under this policy, as most projects will account for these costs in other construction or operations budgeting and financing. Approval of any petition would be subject to a determination by the City Council, in its sole discretion, that sufficient City funds are available. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: Discussion Draft Assessment Policy (See highlighted Section II.C.) Prepared by: Sean Walther, Planning and Zoning Supervisor Reviewed by: Karen Barton, Community Development Director Tim Simon, Chief Financial Officer Approved by: Tom Harmening, City Manager Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 5) Page 2 Title: Special Assessment Policy – Sewer and Water Availability Charges DISCUSSION BACKGROUND: The city council approved the petition of Paul Revere Masonic Center LLC to assess the SAC and WAC for 14 SAC units that were due for the American Legion’s proposed use. When that action was taken, city council directed staff prepare a policy to guide the city’s response to similar requests in the future. The city’s current assessment policy related to fire sprinkler systems provides an opportunity for property owners to finance the cost to install a fire sprinkler system in existing buildings. This process is initiated by the property owner through a petition, and the conditions of the reimbursement are laid out in a contract that is approved by City Council. All the costs incurred by the City are reimbursed by the petitioner. The city council reviews all and acts upon all petitions. Staff proposes a similar approach to petitions for special assessment for SAC and WAC, but with additional eligibility limitations for both the petitioner and the amount of the request. The draft policy language has been incorporated into the city’s current assessment policy, which was last updated in 2016. CURRENT CONSIDERATION: It was not completely clear what criteria the city council intended to be included for these types of requests. It seemed the city wanted to limit the eligibility to non-profit community organizations. As drafted, the SAC and WAC assessment would only apply to properties that are occupied by a non-profit organization that is engaged in works to serve a public purpose, rather than to provide financial benefit to any particular individual, corporation, or entity. This may include charitable organizations or organizations that benefit veterans of the United States Armed Forces. NEXT STEPS: If no feedback is received from city council, staff will place this item on an upcoming consent agenda for approval. If there are substantive policy questions raised that need city council discussion, this topic will be added to an upcoming city council study session agenda. If the new policy is adopted, then an administrative fee for processing SAC and WAC assessment petitions will be added to the 2019 Fee Schedule and administrative forms will be developed to explain and implement the program. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 5) Page 3 Title: Special Assessment Policy – Sewer and Water Availability Charges DRAFT ASSESSMENT POLICY I. Introduction A special assessment is a levy on a property for a particular improvement that benefits the owner(s) of the property. The authority is provided to cities through MN Statutes §, Chapter 429. Special assessments assign cost of the improvement to those receiving a direct benefit from the improvement. Assessment amounts are based upon the total cost of the particular improvement and are allocated by the Council as guided by this policy. The amount assessed against any particular parcel shall not be greater than the increase in the market value of the property due to the improvement. The City Council has the authority to deviate from this policy as deemed appropriate by the Council or when the law requires such a deviation. When the City deviates from the policies identified in this document, it will identify the reasons for the deviation in the feasibility report or at the public hearings associated with the public improvement. This policy does not supersede or replace assessment references in the City Code. II. Improvements to be Assessed A. Municipal Parking Lots The city owns and operates municipal parking lots that are not adjacent to City buildings. The primary uses for these lots is for Transit park and ride or private property parking. 1. Costs to be Assessed a. Reconstruction or Rehabilitation When the condition of the parking lot requires reconstruction or rehabilitation, the total project cost may be levied as a special assessment to benefitting properties in accordance with this policy. The assessment will be levied on a project specific basis. b. Maintenance Costs Annual, seasonal, and preventative maintenance are performed by the City. The total cost may be assessed to benefitting properties on an annual basis. 2. Benefitting Properties The following information will be used to determine the benefitting properties and the number of stalls to assign to each benefitting property for the assessment rate: a. A parking study will be completed to determine the parking lot users. Benefitting properties are ones that have customers or employees that are using the lot. b. A land use review of surrounding properties will be done to determine parking ratios required by City Code and prior approvals. This is done to determine if the properties have adequate private parking. If a property does not have adequate private parking or if parking spaces in the lot were counted to meet their parking ratios, they will be considered a benefitting property. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 5) Page 4 Title: Special Assessment Policy – Sewer and Water Availability Charges 3. Assessment Rate The assessment rate shall be per parking stall. To calculate this rate, the total cost will be divided by the number of stalls in the parking lot. Each benefitting property will be assigned a number of stalls within the parking lot. This rate will be applicable to all reconstruction or rehabilitation projects and annual maintenance costs. The stall assignment is for assessment purposes only. The parking stalls are not for exclusive use of the properties assessed. B. Fire Sprinkler Systems Property owners may petition the city to assess the costs install a fire sprinkler system in an existing building. To be considered under this policy, the proposed work shall result in the sprinkling of the entire building in compliance with the applicable City ordinance and state laws. Petitions will be responded to by the Fire Department. 1. Petition The petition must meet the requirements of MS Chapter 429, as they apply to fire sprinkler systems. The petition, can be in the form of a letter or email, and shall include the following items: a. Fire sprinkler plans and specifications, b. a cost estimate from three (3) qualified companies (licensed by the State of Minnesota as a fire sprinkler contractor) and c. a written statement that the owner(s) shall be responsible for contracting for the actual installation and proper operation of the fire sprinkler system. d. The petitioner(s) must waive all rights to the public hearing and any appeal of the special assessment adopted by the City Council and e. Signatures of all property owners. All petitions for the special assessment of the project must be received and acted upon by the City Council prior to the start of any fire sprinkler installation. The City shall not approve the petition until it has reviewed and approved the plans, specifications, and cost estimates contained in the petition. Consideration of any petition made under this policy is subject to a determination by the City Council, in its sole discretion, that sufficient City funds are available for the project. City staff will periodically advise the Council with regard to the availability of appropriate funds. 2. Costs to be Assessed a. The amount to be specially assessed shall not exceed the amount of the construction estimate, plus any City administrative or interest charges. The petitioner shall be responsible for any construction costs exceeding the amount of the construction estimate. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 5) Page 5 Title: Special Assessment Policy – Sewer and Water Availability Charges b. The administrative fee for processing the sprinkler assessment application shall be set in the City’s fee schedule. c. If the petitioner requests the abandonment of the special assessment project, all City costs incurred shall be reimbursed by the petitioner. 3. Payment of Assessments a. No payment shall be made by the City for any installation until the work is completed and finally approved by the City and the assessment has been adopted. b. If the petitioner requests the abandonment of the special assessment project, all City costs incurred shall be reimbursed by the petitioner. C. Sewer Availability Charges (SAC) and Water Availability Charges (WAC) Property owners may petition the city to assess the costs of Metropolitan Council SAC and City WAC. Petitions will be administered by the (TBD) Department. The requirements for SAC and WAC deferrals include: 1. Eligibility Requirements The City may authorize the assessment of the SAC and WAC charges if the City determines it is in the best interest of the community and if the following conditions are met: a. The occupant of the benefitting property shall be a non-profit organization. b. The occupant shall be engaged in works to serve a public purpose. This may include charitable organizations or organizations that benefit veterans of the United States Armed Forces. c. The maximum SAC and WAC that can be assessed against any property is 25 SAC units. 2. Petition a. The petition shall be submitted to the City of St. Louis Park Administration/Finance Department in writing and the petition submission shall include the following items: i) a valid SAC Determination Letter from the Metropolitan Council that indicates the number of SAC units and any applied SAC unit credits for the proposed property and use(s), and ii) the number of SAC units the petitioner requests to be assessed against the benefitting property, and iii) The petitioner(s) must waive all rights to the public hearing and any appeal of the special assessment adopted by the City Council, and iv) Signatures of all property owners. b. All petitions for the special assessment of the project must be received and acted upon by the City Council. The City Council will not approve the petition until city staff has reviewed and approved all city permits that may be associated with the proposed use and/or required property improvements associated with the petition. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 5) Page 6 Title: Special Assessment Policy – Sewer and Water Availability Charges c. Consideration of any petition made under this policy is subject to a determination by the City Council, in its sole discretion, that sufficient City funds are available for the project. City staff will periodically advise the Council with regard to the availability of appropriate funds. 3. Costs to be Assessed a. The amount to be specially assessed shall not exceed the cost of the SAC and WAC for the non-profit use of the benefiting property based upon Metropolitan Council’s SAC Determination, plus any City administrative or interest charges. b. The petitioner shall be responsible for any SAC and WAC costs exceeding the special assessment amount if the use or project changes following City approvals. c. The administrative fee for processing the SAC and WAC assessment application shall be set in the City’s fee schedule. d. If the petitioner requests the abandonment of the special assessment project, all City costs incurred shall be reimbursed by the petitioner. 4. Payment of Assessments a. No payment shall be made by the City until all required city permits have been approved by the City and the assessment has been adopted. b. If the petitioner requests the abandonment of the special assessment project, all City costs incurred shall be reimbursed by the petitioner. III. Assessment Considerations All properties benefiting from improvements are subject to the special assessment. The project types to be assessed are not limited to those explicitly described in this policy. The City Council reserves the right to consider additional infrastructure improvements on a case by case basis for assessment, including but not limited to storm drainage improvements, streets, sanitary sewer, water, street lights, walls, noise walls, boulevard trees, and sidewalks (both new and replaced). IV. Payment of Assessments A. Duration The length of time that assessments are to be paid varies according to the total cost assessed according to the following table: $1.00 to $99.99 1 year $100 to $499.99 5 years $500 and over 10 years B. Interest Rate Interest rates vary based on project financing, but are set no more than 2% above the City’s rate on the sale of bonds or U. S. Treasury rate if the project is financed with existing City funds. C. Repayment Schedule 1. All unpaid balances will be certified to Hennepin County for payment with property taxes after November 1 of the year in which the assessment hearing was conducted. Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 5) Page 7 Title: Special Assessment Policy – Sewer and Water Availability Charges a. Property owners can pay the entire assessment following the adoption of the assessment roll with no interest charged. b. Property owners may also make an interest free partial payment. For ease of administration, a minimum of 25% of the assessable cost must be applied for a partial payment 2. Interest will start accruing on all unpaid balances on December 1 of the year in which the assessment hearing was conducted. V. Definitions: For the purposes of this policy, the following definitions will apply: RECONSTRUCTION - will be defined as a project whereby all meaningful elements of a facility are analyzed for removal and replacement. These include curb and gutter, bituminous or concrete pavement, gravel base, subgrade replacement as necessary and items appurtenant to these elements. REHABILITATION – will be defined as a project whereby the pavement, gravel base and other roadway items are reclaimed or replaced. These elements included bituminous or concrete pavement, gravel base and subgrade replacement as necessary, spot replacement of concrete curb and gutter and driveways. TOTAL COST- A. Reconstruction and Rehabilitation Cost The total project cost for reconstruction and rehabilitation projects includes the following: Construction cost plus engineering, administration, legal fees, assessment rolls, plus right-of-way costs (fee acquisition and/or easement costs including staff time) and temporary funding charges, plus other charges for services and contingencies, plus any assessable charges from other governmental agencies (i.e. Metropolitan Council Environmental Services, Hennepin County, State of Minnesota), plus any assessable costs previously incurred by the City. A portion of other contributing funds from the City (i.e. MSA), Trunk Utility, Water Resources, etc.) or outside governmental agencies may be deducted from the total improvement cost to determine the assessable cost. B. Maintenance Cost The total cost for annual, seasonal, and preventative maintenance includes, but is not limited to, the following: Sealcoating, crack sealing, patching, striping, signage, snow removal, sweeping, power for lighting, replacement or maintenance of bike racks and other fixtures within the lots, landscape maintenance, storm sewer maintenance and any other work deemed necessary to ensure a facility is in good condition. Meeting: Study Session Meeting Date: May 14, 2018 Written Report: 6 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: Dockless Bicycles Update RECOMMENDED ACTION: None at this time, Staff will be attending the May 29 study session to discuss this item and receive council direction on a path forward regarding dockless bicycles. POLICY CONSIDERATION: Does the City Council want City staff to pursue procuring dockless bicycle services in the near future or wait to learn from other cities’ experiences? SUMMARY: In February, an interdepartmental dockless bicycle taskforce was formed to discuss the emerging technology and how it relates to St. Louis Park. The group has met monthly since February. The taskforce has developed two options for the city to pursue at this time and are seeking council direction on next steps. There are pros and cons to each option that should be weighed before making a decision. A.No Action at this Time Waiting to implement (if the City implements in the future) allows us to observe the other cities and develop a better understanding of common problems and solutions that arise. This will make St. Louis Park better prepared to host the technology. However, waiting may contradict Climate Action Plan goals regarding increasing non-motorized transportation access and decreasing vehicle miles traveled. B.Actively Pursue Dockless Bikes in St. Louis Park Implementing the technology now would increase the accessibility to non-motorized travel in St. Louis Park. Implementing now could also result in increased staff time dedicated to the management of the bikes in respect to public outreach and customer service. This is normally done by the dockless bike company, but the average resident would think to call the City first before another company. FINANCIAL OR BUDGET CONSIDERATION: Not applicable. VISION CONSIDERATION: St. Louis Park is committed to being a connected and engaged community. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: Discussion Prepared by: Ben Manibog, Transportation Engineer Reviewed by: Debra Heiser, Engineering Director Approved by: Tom Harmening, City Manager Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 6) Page 2 Title: Dockless Bicycles Update DISCUSSION BACKGROUND: In February, an interdepartmental dockless bicycle taskforce was formed to discuss the emerging technology and how it relates to St. Louis Park. The group has met monthly. On February 26, 2018, City Council was given a report titled, “Dockless Bicycles”. The report informed council about what dockless bike share is, how it works, and its place in the Twin Cities. This report is an update explaining where dockless bike share are today in the Twin Cities, and where St. Louis Park may or may not fit in the picture at this time. Twin Cities Update The City of Golden Valley approved an MOU with a dockless bike company, Lime, in March and will be operational sometime this year. It is estimated that they will have about 200 bikes available for rent across the city. This is a non-exclusive arrangement. The City of Edina approved an MOU with Lime on May 1, 2018. It is expected that Edina’s bikes will launch the same time as Golden Valley sometime this year. It is estimated that they will have about 500 bikes available. This is a non-exclusive arrangement. The City of Minneapolis amended their bicycle ordinance to accommodate dockless bike share on April 27, 2018. In addition, Minneapolis updated their bike share agreement with NiceRide to include Motivate’s relationship. Minneapolis’ agreement is exclusive to Motivate. While Lime users will be able to bike through Minneapolis, they not be allowed to end their trip and drop off their bike within the city’s borders. Staff Recommendation The taskforce is looking for direction from council on a path forward regarding dockless bicycles. The group has come up with two recommended options. They are described below. In either case, the taskforce has been weighing the pros and cons. Regardless of the option we pursue, there are additional questions that have to be answered by the city. These are summarized below. A.No Action at This Time: Choosing this option would direct staff to not pursue getting dockless bikes at this time. Moving forward, St. Louis Park would get to learn what works and what doesn’t work in Golden Valley, Edina, and Minneapolis. Furthermore, St. Louis Park would be able to take these lessons learned and employ a better strategy if we choose to pursue dockless bikes in the future. Situations the city would get to learn more about in the process include but are not limited to the relationship between city staff and the company, resident feedback and how much residents actually use the service. Downsides to waiting to see what happens may include •Perception that St. Louis Park does not support alternative transportation options. •The City may still have to deal with dockless bikes being left within our city limits. Concerns regarding safety, aesthetics, and right-of-way management will fall to staff to resolve. If Council direction is to not take action at this time, the following questions still have to be answered: •If a dockless bike is left on City right-of-way, how do we respond? o Do we impound them if the company does not respond? o Do we issue fines? •If City employee time and dollars are spent dealing with these bikes, what should be done? o Do we charge for staff time to respond to concerns from the public? Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 6) Page 3 Title: Dockless Bicycles Update B. Pursue Getting Dockless Bikes in St. Louis Park: Choosing this option would direct staff to pursue getting dockless bikes operational in St. Louis Park. Moving forward, staff would explore opportunities for dockless bike companies to offer their services within the city. This would include contacting the two companies operating in the Twin Cities (Lime and Motivate). Positive outcomes to this decision include offering uninterrupted bike service for residents across the west metro suburbs and/or between our city and Minneapolis. The City would be able to offer more access to non-vehicular transportation to residents without any direct cost to the City or our residents. The goal of reducing vehicle trips is in line with goals within the newly approved Climate Action Plan. Downsides to pursuing these bikes include unforeseen consequences with piloting new programs with new technology. There have been reports across the country about the dockless bikes being vandalized, taken onto/into private property, and put in dangerous places (on railroad tracks). There may be situations in which the police are contacted for something related to the bikes. If Council decides that staff should pursue dockless bikes, the taskforce recommends the following: • Pursue a non-exclusive Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Lime to bring their services to the City. • Contact Motivate exploring the possibility of expanding their service to the City. If the City pursues dockless technology, there are a few things that have to be done beforehand. In existing public MOUs between dockless companies and Minnesota cities, there have not been guarantees regarding racial equity and equal access to services. With the city’s continued efforts in advancing racial equity, it would be important to ask for equitable service within our city. Negotiating a revised MOU will take time. It is unlikely that an agreement will be reached before the end of summer. Other questions staff has identified that should be addressed include but are not limited to: • Where can or should these bikes be parked in the city? • What types of dockless technology does the city desire? ie. Bikes, e-bikes, scooters? • Is there a preferred system connectability the city desires? ie. Connect with suburbs only, connect with Minneapolis only, all of the above? • Would there be a desire to create a permit-based system in the future? • What does the public desire? If the Council directs staff to move forward with dockless bikes, staff will reach out to the public for comments regarding the service. This will be in the form of a survey specifically geared toward public support of the technology. Meeting: Study Session Meeting Date: May 14, 2018 Written Report: 7 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: 2019 Pavement Management CIP Update RECOMMENDED ACTION: None at this time. This report is intended to provide the council with a preview of the Pavement Management and Connect the Park Projects for 2019. POLICY CONSIDERATION: Does the City Council wish to pursue the installation of sidewalks segments identified in this report as a part of our annual Pavement Management Project? SUMMARY: The Engineering Department has been working on the project scope for the 2019 Pavement Management Project. This annual project rehabilitates several miles of local residential streets. Next year, the streets to be rehabilitated are located in Pavement Management Area 7 and include the Pennsylvania, Willow Park, and Eliot View Neighborhoods. This report will discuss updates regarding the Pavement Management Project currently programmed for 2019 implementation, proposed Connect the Park sidewalk segments, gap sidewalk segments, and other related initiatives. FINANCIAL OR BUDGET CONSIDERATION: This project is included in the City’s 2019 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) and will be paid for using, franchise fees, utility funds, and General Obligation Bonds. VISION CONSIDERATION: St. Louis Park is committed to being a connected and engaged community. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: Discussion Attachment #1- 2019 Pavement Management Map Prepared by: Aaron Wiesen, Project Engineer Reviewed by: Debra Heiser, Engineering Director Approved by: Tom Harmening, City Manager Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 7) Page 2 Title: 2019 Pavement Management CIP Update DISCUSSION BACKGROUND: The City’s Pavement Management Program (PMP) proactively addresses the condition of the residential streets within the city. Many of these streets are now approaching 50 years of age or more. The PMP was developed in 2003 to extend pavement life and enhance system-wide performance in a cost-effective and efficient way by providing the right pavement strategy at the right time. Street rehabilitation work consists of removing and replacing the existing bituminous pavement and replacing portions of concrete curb and gutter as needed. Other work includes sewer repairs and watermain replacement. In addition to the needed street and utility work, the city council has provided staff direction to look at all aspects of neighborhood livability and “Living Streets” considerations as a part of our transportation projects. As a part of project development, staff will review gaps in the existing sidewalk network, storm water runoff, traffic management and aesthetics. The project includes proposed sidewalk/trail segments in the city’s Connect the Park 10-year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP). Connect the Park is the city's 10-year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) to add additional sidewalks, trails, and bikeways throughout the community. The primary goal of Connect the Park is to develop a comprehensive, city-wide network of sidewalks, trails, and bikeways that provides local and regional connectivity, improves safety and accessibility, and enhances overall community livability. This is achieved by creating a system plan that provides sidewalks approximately every ¼-mile and bikeways every ½-mile in order to improve pedestrian and bicycle connectivity throughout the community. Every year, staff brings proposed amendments to the plan to the City Council based on community feedback, agency coordination, and internal evaluation of all planned projects. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This year’s project will be performed in Area 7 of the City’s eight pavement management areas. It includes work in the Pennsylvania, Willow Park, and Eliot View Neighborhoods. The attached maps identify the streets in Area 7 that have been selected for rehabilitation and outlines the various work to be performed on each street. Selection was based on street condition and field evaluations to determine the condition of the pavement, curb and gutter, and the city’s underground utilities. Pavement Management Throughout the public process staff will provide information on the overall project scope. The Pavement Management project includes the following: • Pavement rehabilitation • Watermain and water service replacement • Storm and Sanitary Sewer repairs • Street width evaluation • Stormwater improvements • Sidewalks repair and new construction • Street Trees • Traffic Control • Fiber Conduit Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 7) Page 3 Title: 2019 Pavement Management CIP Update Connect the Park Connect the Park is the city's 10-year Capital Improvement Plan to add sidewalks, trails, and bikeways throughout the community. This year there are sidewalk segments in the Connect the Park plan located in Pavement Management Area 7. The following sidewalk/trail segments are being evaluated as a part of the Connect the Park CIP (see attached map): • Quebec Avenue (Cedar Lake Road to 24th Street) - East Side • Pennsylvania Avenue (Quebec Avenue to 22nd Street) - East or West Side o Will evaluate both sides for impacts, costs etc. but recommend only one side • 22nd Street (Quebec Drive to 22nd Street cul des sac) - North Side • Bituminous Trail (22nd Street to Franklin Avenue) Gap Sidewalks Past Council policy direction has been to evaluate the sidewalk system as a part of all transportation projects and identify gaps in the network. As a part of project development, the sidewalk network adjacent to the streets were reviewed and there are a number of sidewalk gap segments under consideration as a part of this project. For purposes of discussion, a “gap” is considered a section of sidewalk that is missing on a continuous street block. In this pavement management area there are not many existing sidewalks; as a result, the number of gap sidewalk segments are much lower than in previous years. The following sidewalk segments are being evaluated as gap sidewalk segments (see attached map): • 14th Street (Texas Avenue to Pennsylvania Avenue) - South Side • Pennsylvania Avenue (14th Street to Wayzata Boulevard) - West Side • Nevada Avenue (Dead end to Cedar Lake Road) - East Side Resident Feedback on Sidewalks In the past projects, at the public open houses and through correspondence with residents, residents have expressed a need for more sidewalk connections in the neighborhood than what the city shows as a Connect the Park or a gap sidewalk segment. If the city receives interest in adding sidewalk segments, staff will evaluate and make recommendations on inclusion with the project. NEXT STEPS: Unless directed otherwise by the Council, the sidewalk segments in this report will be brought to the community for feedback and input at the Public Open House #1. Staff typically begins a public process approximately 9 months prior to proposed construction. Each recommended segment will not be approved for construction until it is brought to the City Council for a Public Hearing. Below is the proposed schedule for the 2019 Pavement Management Project. Design Summer/Fall 2018 Public Open House #1- Kickoff/Listening Session July 2018 Public Open House #2- Preliminary Design Review September 2018 Public Open House #3- Final Design Layouts December 2018 Council Study Session January 14, 2019 Council Meeting- Public Hearing January 22, 2019 Council Meeting- Project Approval February 4, 2019 Bid Opening March 2019 Award Bid (Council Meeting) April 1, 2019 Construction May to November 2019 27TH ST W C E D A R L A K E R D F R A N K L IN AVEW HAMPSHIREAVESVIR G IN IA AVESFRANKLIN AVE W V IC T O R IA CURV WAYZATA BLVD 28TH ST WTEXASAVESQUEBECAVESVIRGINIAAVES GEORGIAAVES2 2 N D S TW 14TH ST W LOUISIANAAVESPENNSYLVANIAAVESOREGONAVESV I C T O R I A CI RLOUISIANA CT 26TH ST W TEXASAVESUTAHAVESIDAHOAVESWESTWOODHILLSDRLOUISIANAAVES25TH ST W LOUISIANAAVESVICTORI A W A YUTAHDR KENTUCKYAVESKENTUCKY L NBURD PLWESTWOODHILL S R D QUE BECAVE S23RD ST W 16TH ST W FR ANKLIN AVE W RHODEISLANDAVE S 18TH ST W 22ND ST W 24TH ST W 18TH ST W EDGEWOODAVES16TH ST W 13TH LN W RHODEISLANDAVES26TH ST W18THSTW ELIOT VI E W R D PENNSYLVANIAAVES18THSTW 24TH S T W JERSEYAVES22ND ST W SUMTERAVESQUEBECAVESOREGONAVES2 3 R D S T W NEVADAAVESMARYLANDAVESKENTUCKYAVESJERSEYAVESIDAHOAVESHAMPSHIREAVESFLORIDAAVESEDGEWOODAVES13TH LN W OREGONCT13 1/2 ST W 2 3 R D ST WVIRGINIAAVESQUEBECDR 16TH ST W OREGONAVESMARYLANDAVESNEVADAAVESIDAHOAVESDAKOTAAVESNEVADAAVESRHODEISLANDAVESVIRGINIAAVES14TH ST W UTAH AVE SHAMPSHIREAVESVIRGINIA CIR N SUMTERAVESEDGEWOODAVES§¨¦394 0 1,000 2,000500Feet± Legend Proposed Sidewalks Connect the Park Sidewalk Sidewalk Gap PM_Segments_2019 Rehab Candidate Street Rehabilitation Street Rehabilitation & Watermiain Existing Sidewalks Existing Trails 2019 Pavement Management Project Study Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 7) Title: 2019 Pavement Management CIP Update Page 4 Meeting: Study Session Meeting Date: May 14, 2018 Written Report: 8 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: Westwood Hills Nature Center Project Update RECOMMENDED ACTION: None at this time. In advance of bringing the matter before the Council at its May 21 meeting for authorization to move forward to the next phase of this project, staff desires to provide important updated information. POLICY CONSIDERATION: Should staff continue to proceed with bringing this project to the City Council on May 21 to approve the Design Development Phase and authorize the preparation of construction plans and specifications for the building? SUMMARY: Staff has worked with HGA architecture and RJM Construction to further the design of the WHNC and refine cost estimates. During the current design development phase, soil testing was done to determine the quality of soils and appropriate foundation design. American Engineering Testing (AET) performed 13 soil borings which were drilled to 35 feet and tested for building footing suitability. The findings from these borings determined the soils were much more mucky and unsuitable than originally anticipated (NOTE – the soil issues are not related to contamination). While the estimated project budget did anticipate the need for soil correction, the condition of the soils will require a foundation system more expensive than currently included in the budget by approximately $500,000 FINANCIAL OR BUDGET CONSIDERATION: At the time the Council authorized staff to begin the design development phase last December, the estimated total project budget was $12 million. Included in this amount are funds allocated for inflation for construction occurring in 2019 along with contingency funds for the design phase ($400,000) and construction phase (approx. $600,000). It’s possible, but not guaranteed, that the full amount of the contingency funds will not be needed and thereby offset all or part of the additional soils correction expense. It’s also possible that the bids for the project may come in lower than anticipated and help offset the extra soils expense. Having said the above, as the Council considers moving into the next phase of project development (preparation of construction plans and specs) staff would advise that the project budget be assumed to be $12.5 million. If the council is not comfortable using that assumption as part of moving to the next phase, staff and council will need to have a study session discussion about the council’s priorities for the various proposed components/features of the building as a means to lower the estimated budget back to $12 million. VISION CONSIDERATION: St. Louis Park is committed to being a leader in environmental stewardship. We will increase environmental consciousness and responsibility in all areas of city business. SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: Building Design Footprint Prepared by: Cynthia S. Walsh, Operations and Recreation Department Director Approved by: Tom Harmening, City Manager LEGENDADMINBUILDINGSUPPORTCIRCULATIONEDUCATIONEXTERIORPROGRAMSUPPORTPUBLICGATHERINGSUPPORTCAGEEAGLECAGEOWLCAGEHAWKRAPTORCAREWARMMEWMEWOWLMEWEAGLEGATHERING/EXHIBITLOUNGERENTALSSTAFFOFFICEENTRANCEUTILITY/RECEIVINGWORKROOMDISPLAYWORK RMCAGEPORCWARMMEWCATERINGSTAGINGGROUPENTRYPROGRAMSTORAGEMAINTENANCEMECHCONF /READINGMECHMGROFFICETELECOMVESTIBULEQUIETFAMILYCLASSROOMDECKEXHIBITTERRACE?MENWOMENSTOR CSTOR BWELCOMESTOR AELECStudy Session Meeting of May 14, 2018 (Item No. 8) Title: Westwood Hills Nature Center Project UpdatePage 2